Having trouble viewing this email? Read it online.


Monday, August 15, 2011

 

Different Shades of Taint

Today the commission heads into its final meeting with everyone expecting them to approve the state legislative, congressional and BOE plans.  While most commissioners appear smugly proud of their work, groups on the outside are finding and exposing the taint.

John Hrabe, taint expert, has released a statement from Commissioner Ward that exposes the dark underside of the commission process.  Republican Party Chairman claims the goods have been kept hidden beyond public view and Doug Johnson from the Rose Institute claims he has found a vulnerability which, if exposed, could result in a Federal Department of Justice veto of the entire work product.

From a technical standpoint the Johnson claims are the most interesting.   According to Johnson, who lost the statewide gig to Q2, the data they have been using improperly assigns the Citizen Voting Age Population counts to their respective census blocks.

A Redistricting Partners peek at the data supports this claim.  Nearly 20,000 census blocks used by the commission show Adult Citizens although the census shows no actual people there.  The most egregious census block shows 11,020 Adult Citizens in a precinct in Kings County, just outside the Corcoran prison, even though there is nobody there (maybe the guards should peek out the windows and make sure).  In total the commission data shows 248,000 people who exist in places with no people.  Looking for census blocks where the CVAP number is higher than the population number yields 68,000 census blocks with a total of 3.8 million Citizen Adults, but only 2.4 million actual people. 

The CVAP data is estimated and used only in Voting rights cases, not the district population counts.  And this improper disaggregation of the data to the census block level has only a small impact on the percentage calculations of Latinos, Asians and African Americans in the new districts, but it does appear to be a blow to the commission’s credibility among the 20 people in CA that understand how to weight the disaggregation of redistricting data.

While most readers snooze through these discussions, this technical debate spilled over into a brawl at a recent Studio Sacramento taping.  An argument about the weighted disaggregation of CVAP resulted in a full-out fist fight between Time Magazine’s Redistricting expert Matt Rexroad and The Economist’s expert Paul Mitchell.  The fight was broken up by host Scott Syphax and Helen Hutchinson from League of Women Voters. 

If you have been following the Redistricting Drama and want to let off some steam tonight, visit the informal “Redistricting Social,” hosted by California Common Cause at the Capitol Garage tonight at 5:30.  Hang out, have a few drinks, but plan on getting out of there before anyone starts exposing taint. 

State

Studio Sacramento : Redistricting Maps
KVIE
How will the new redistricting maps impact who represents you in government? And did the arduous process of drawing new boundaries prove that politics in California can be reformed?  Guests include Paul Mitchell, Matt Rexroad and Helen Hutchinson.

Mike Ward: Redistricting Panel Broke Law

Cal Watchdog
A member of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission believes that the commission broke the law, failed to uphold an open and transparent decision-making process and used political motives in drawing California’s new state and federal legislative districts, according to an exclusive, in-depth interview with CalWatchDog.com. “This commission simply traded the partisan, backroom gerrymandering by the Legislature for partisan, backroom gerrymandering by average citizens,” Commissioner Mike Ward said in an interview with CalWatchDog.com on Sunday night.

Menlo Park congressional split 'another little insult' for Belle Haven neighborhood?

MercuryNews.com
Today, eight freeway lanes separate eastern Menlo Park from the rest of the city. Soon, a congressional district line could further divide east and west. Under proposed maps drafted by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission, which was charged with redrawing state and federal political boundaries to reflect the latest census figures, Menlo Park would be split into two congressional districts.

Redistricting map on Turlock agenda
The Modesto Bee
The California Citizens Redistricting Commission, charged with redrawing legislative and congressional lines with data from the 2010 census, released proposed final maps earlier this month. If the maps stand, Turlock would become part of the 8th District, sharing a senator with several foothills communities in an area that stretches to Rancho Cordova. Michael Cooke, the city's regulatory affairs manager, said in a report to the council for tonight's meeting that keeping the city in a district with other Northern San Joaquin Valley communities makes more sense.

Redistricting Plan Will Impact Moorpark
Agoura Hills Patch
Based on the latest maps, Moorpark and Agoura Hills  will be sharing a state senator as part of Senate District 27. The district would include Moorpark along with the Conejo Valley cities Agoura Hills, Calabasas, Thousand Oaks and Westlake Village. In addition, the zone would extend south to Malibu, east to Chatsworth and Encino and north into Simi Valley and the Stevenson Ranch area of Santa Clarita County.

Boundary Changes Transform Local Districts
EGPNews.com
On July 29—the same day the commission approved the final preliminary maps—US Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, who serves the 34th Congressional District, announced she will be running for the redrawn 40th Congressional District, which she said  “includes the southeast communities I have proudly represented for many years.” “I look forward to running for re-election and asking my constituents to grant me the honor of continuing the level of constituent service and representation that they have come to expect from me and my office,” Roybal-Allard said in a written statement.

Electoral districts reform falls short
Colusa County Sun Herald
Under the guise of reform, California's electoral districts soon will be transformed. This time, redrawing state Senate and Assembly, Board of Equalization and congressional districts was supposed to rise above politics. So much for reform. California got gerrymandering by a different name. New boundaries were shaped by determined, self-serving interests of different political players. Instead of two political parties, reform created a battleground for myriad special interests to create districts to serve their interests. It's the same old song, this time sung in a disparate cacophony.

Redistricting panel is expected to approve new maps
Los Angeles Times
Each map needs at least three yes votes from each of the groups that make up the commission — five Republicans, five Democrats and four independents. The lines for any set of maps — legislative, congressional or Board of Equalization districts — that fails to win approval will be drawn by three "special masters" appointed by the state Supreme Court. Those who are unhappy, including the California Republican Party, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and some individuals upset by new alignments of their communities, have the option of asking the courts to overturn the maps or of seeking a voter referendum.

Alternative maps worth a look
The Sun
Before the citizens' commission responsible for parsing California into state legislative and federal congressional districts finalizes its maps, it should take another look at alternatives proposed by the San Bernardino County Democratic Central Committee. The California Citizens Redistricting Commission is expected to finalize boundaries for state Assembly and Senate and U.S. congressional districts on Monday - marking the end of a multiyear effort by voters to take redistricting out of the hands of politicians.

California redistricting commission can be model for the nation
MercuryNews.com
But even if the commission's final maps were as screwy as the ones the Legislature drew 10 years ago -- and they're not -- this method would be a success. The commissioners worked in the open, and they took seriously the concerns of those who matter most: Californians, not just politicians. Yes, it cost more than the $3 million projected when Proposition 11 was approved in 2008 -- the same amount the Legislature spent on redistricting in 2000. But higher cost was inevitable. The redistricting staff vetted more than 30,000 applicants. The commission held 34 public hearings statewide, taking testimony from some 3,000 people in person and 20,000 in writing. Of course it's cheaper if you do it all behind closed doors.

Redistricting plan creates a dilemma for Tom Berryhill
The Modesto Bee
Tom Berryhill has a decision to make, and it's a tough one. It boils down to this: Make his own life a little easier, for the short term anyway, or make a sacrifice for the team. That's the simple explanation, except it really isn't simple. Here goes: On Monday, the Citizens Redistricting Commission is scheduled to hold its final vote on the maps it has drawn for new legislative and congressional districts in California. If the proposed maps are approved and stand, Berryhill will be in the 5th Senate District. And if he wants to represent that district, he'd have to run in 2012.

State Redistricting Looks Good for Local Latinos, Says Public Policy Exec
EGPNews.com
The state’s preliminary final maps for the eastern portion of Los Angeles County look good for Latino elected officials and preserves seniority for Congressional representation, Jaime A. Regalado, executive director of the Pat Brown Institute of Public Affairs told EGP on Tuesday. He was responding to a question on what impact the proposed new Congressional and State Senate and Assembly districts will have locally. The boundary changes and renumbering have impacted all local districts and as a result, elected officials are staking claims to the districts that have the majority of their current geography and constituency.

Ron Calderon announces plans to run for Congress in new 38th district
Pasadena Star-News
State Sen. Ron Calderon, D-Montebello, said today that he will seek to represent the proposed 38th Congressional District, which spans from South El Monte to Hawaiian Gardens. The new district would include the cities of Artesia, Bellflower, Cerritos, Hawaiian Gardens, La Mirada, Lakewood, Montebello, Norwalk, Pico Rivera, Santa Fe Springs, South El Monte, Whittier and portions of unincorporated Los Angeles County.

Democrats unsatisfied with new lines
Our Weekly
Redistricting has stirred up controversy among party members on both sides statewide. But the deadline for comments on the final drawing of new congressional, state assembly and senate as well as board of equalization district lines are due Monday, and the unhappiness may not change. However, in the Antelope Valley, Republicans seem content, while the other side does not see the benefit of the new lines.

Redistricting process open, if not perfect
Los Banos Enterprise
State Republican Party leaders are carping about what they are claiming is a failed experiment at permitting citizens to redraw legislative boundaries. The California Republican Party endorsed the two initiatives -- Propositions 20 and 11 -- that brought about the Citizens Redistricting Commission. Now, some party leaders, including Chairman Tom Del Beccaro, are having buyer's remorse because, based on the way the commission has drawn political boundaries, the Republicans are likely to lose congressional seats in the 2012 election.

Redistricting May Link Coastal Communities
Coronado Patch
The political lines that determine who represents Coronadans in Washington and Sacramento may be shifting. Depending on what happens with Monday's vote, starting with the June 2012 primary Coronado could be voting for a representative from three newly constituted districts.

Removing Politics from Politics
City Journal
An investigation last month by CalWatchDog.com, which I edit, revealed that at least one of the 14 commissioners in charge of drawing new district lines for California’s elected representatives had made multiple political campaign contributions to Democratic candidates—contributions that were previously undisclosed to the California Citizens Redistricting Commission. The commissioner, Gabino Aguirre, also has an extensive web of connections—similarly undisclosed—to a special-interest group that submitted its own redistricting proposals to the commission.

Who's running for congress in California?
Election Insights and Analysis
California will literally be the Wild West next year. Because the elections should be very wild. There are now 7 open congressional seats and there likely will be more. Most states don't even have 7 seats. Due to the redistricting some incumbents' districts are too unfavorable to run in. So they're either running elsewhere, retiring, or in limbo. Lynn Woolsey and Bob Filner are retiring. Howard Berman and Brad Sherman are Democrats running against each other, while Ed Royce and Gary Miller are likely Republicans opposing each other. David Dreier, Elton Gallegly, Linda Sanchez, and Dennis Cardoza have been silent about their plans.

California incumbents seek new districts to call home
The Washington Post
The California Citizens Redistricting Commission is expected to sign off on its final draft redistricting maps next week. In the meantime, members of the state’s congressional delegation – most of whom were drawn into districts with other incumbents – are frantically searching for new places to call home. For most of them, the choice was pretty clear. For others … well, things are more complicated. The last two weeks have been a blur of positioning for these new seats, and given that California contains more than one in every ten U.S. House seats, we thought it was a good idea to keep you updated.

New Whittier congressional district could mean hot three-headed race for 2012
Whittier Daily News
Look for a potential three-headed, hotly contested congressional race in the Democratic primary in the new district that will encompass most of the Whittier area. Assuming the proposed area remains the same after final redistricting, the Democratic primary could see a fight between state Sen. Ron Calderon, D-Montebello; Rep. Grace Napolitano, D-Santa Fe Springs; and Rep. Linda S nchez, D-Lakewood. Calderon and Napolitano already have announced they're running, while Sanchez has been keeping silent until the final boundaries are approved.

Redistricting Maps Redraw Pocket Political Landscape
Pocket Online
The 14 members of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission this week finished a series of meetings designed to gather public comment about the first draft of new maps to govern our political representation. The maps mean some changes for who will represent the Pocket and Greenhaven neighborhoods. Tuesday evening at the State Capitol nine of the Commission members presided over a three-hour hearing to gather public comment about the proposed changes to California’s political borders.

Redistricting maps await ratification vote Aug.15
Champion Newspapers
Preliminary final maps produced by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission are available for public review period until the commission votes to ratify them Aug. 15. Chino is to be included in the new 35th congressional district along with Ontario, Pomona, Montclair, Rancho Cucamonga and the unincorporated county area between Rancho Cucamonga and Fontana. Chino Hills is to be part of the 39th congressional district with the north Orange County cities of La Habra, Buena Park, Brea, Placentia and Yorba Linda and the Los Angeles County cities of Diamond Bar, Walnut, Rowland Heights, Hacienda Heights, and La Habra Heights.

Berman getting backing from GOP side
Daily News Los Angeles
So far, the city has been on the slow track when it comes to redrawing political boundaries. With the state boundaries to be finalized today, the Los Angeles Redistricting Commission is to be announced by Wednesday and will begin work on new maps for the 2013 election. The city has set aside a budget of $1 million to cover the panel's work, which will involve hiring an executive director and staff to develop the maps for the City Council and Los Angeles Unified Board of Education.

For Some, Redistricting is Splitsville
KQED News
The complexity and controversy of shaping political maps based, when possible, on community boundaries has been a dominant theme of the dozens of meetings and decisions made by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission. On Monday morning's edition of The California Report, we take a look at how some of those decisions have left some grumbling in different parts of the state, while commissioners believe the new maps reflect a thoughtful and careful deference to the needs of the public.

Republicans Ponder Putting New California Map to the Voters
Roll Call
With the nonpartisan California redistricting commission scheduled to complete its work Monday, state Republicans are seriously weighing whether to seek a referendum that could throw out the results and force the state Supreme Court to draw lines for next year’s election. The new plan could jeopardize as many as a half-dozen of Republicans’ 19 House seats in the California delegation. “It’s hard to believe that the Supreme Court can draw worse lines for Republicans,” said Jim Brulte, the former Senate GOP leader who remains active in state politics as a partner with California Strategies, a public-affairs firm.

Redistricting Map Expected to be Approved
Belmont Shore-Naples Patch
Long Beach City Councilman Gary DeLong plans on taking advantage of the new boundaries and said last week that he will run for U.S. Congress in 2012. “If at the end of the redistricting process there is a competitive Long Beach seat, I'm running,” DeLong told Belmont-Shores Patch. “I look forward to the opportunity to bring fiscal sanity to Washington DC ... the current approach of burdening future generations with more and more debt clearly will result in a reduced quality of life for American families. We need to reverse course, the sooner the better.”

Calif. Redistricting Likely To Have National Impact
NPR
The political landscape in California is on the verge of drastic change. On Monday, the state's Citizens Redistricting Commission is expected to give final approval to a new map of congressional and legislative districts. Those newly drawn districts, combined with a new primary election system, are likely to shake up California's political status quo for the first time in two decades. Guest host John Ydstie talks to Bruce Cain, director of the University of California Washington Center, about the national implications of redistricting in California.

Redistricting panel didn't follow law on Senate lines
The Sacramento Bee
When California voters created the California Redistricting Commission, they wanted just that – a free and fair process. Unfortunately, the manner in which the Senate lines were drawn was more partisan than fair, and simply failed to comply with the law. Voters have no choice but to rectify this problem by referendum. Insider Democrats have concluded that the new lines put them within reach of a supermajority in the California Senate. If they achieve that, they could vote for higher taxes and fees without a single Republican vote.

Will redistricting benefit GOP in North County, statewide?
North County Times
First off, California's 53-seat congressional delegation, which currently comprises 34 Democrats and 19 Republicans, is expected to tilt more heavily Democratic. According to former California Republican Party Chairman Ron Nehring, the commission created 40 districts where Democratic-registered voters form a plurality and only 13 districts in which Republicans are the largest party.

Redistricting leaves Congressman Cardoza's future in doubt
abc30.com
Congressman Dennis Cardoza's current seat in the 18th District stretches from Stockton to North Fresno is expected to be cut up and changed, absorbing parts of Democrat Jim Costa's current 20th District and Republican Jeff Denham's 19th Congressional District. Political Science Professor Tom Holyoke of Fresno State says it leaves Cardoza, a five term Democrat in a tough spot.

Local

Redistricting, Round Two: Drawing Local Legislative Lines
KCET
The main questions which will be answered by this latest round of redistricting seem to be whether the new lines will, for the first time, lead to a board where nonwhites are the majority, and whether the lines will increase the power of Democrats on the local level. In past rounds of redistricting, districts were gerrymandered to create majority-minority districts, which have lead to a majority-Latino district, and a plurality African American district.

Stadium Deal and District Map: What Was Decided?
KCET
The "status quo" plan recommended by the board's Boundary Review Committee moves two cities and several unincorporated areas from one district to another to balance population growth since 2000, but without creating another district with a majority of Latino residents. Supervisor Gloria Molina was sharply critical of the boundary committee's recommendation when the board met on Tuesday. She and Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas favor a plan that carves out a Latino-centric district, like the one Molina represents, mostly from Supervisor Don Knabe's 4th district.

Supervisorial redistricting: County OKs plan
Siskiyou Daily
About 200 people in Siskiyou County will be affected by the supervisorial redistricting plan the Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors intends to adopt At their Tuesday meeting, the supervisors held a second public hearing regarding the redistricting, which the Siskiyou County Clerk’s Office is required to consider every 10 years following the release of census numbers.

Students must be properly represented
The Daily Californian
In many ways, student culture is deeply embedded within the city’s social fabric. Even Berkeley’s global reputation for being a beacon of liberal activism is rooted in the student protest movements of the Sixties. The truth is that, despite students’ contribution to our cultural and economic vitality, there has only ever been one student elected to City Council in all of Berkeley’s history. Since the districts were created in 1986, not a single student has been elected to the Council.

Redistricting misstep placed Wagenknecht in wrong district
Napa Valley Register
County Supervisor Brad Wagenknecht should be pleased with the changes made to the county’s latest round of redistricting maps. They were, after all, drawn for his benefit. In the newest set of maps, Wagenknecht is drawn back into the county’s 1st Supervisorial District — the area he has represented on the county’s Board of Supervisors for the last 13 years. A previous draft of the maps — the ones vetted before residents in both American Canyon and Yountville earlier this summer — had inadvertently placed Wagenknecht’s home in District 2, which is currently represented by Supervisor Mark Luce.

Redistricting: Where we are, how we got here
The Sacramento Press
Maya Wallace, a state worker who served on the advisory committee, said after the council meeting Tuesday that none of the committee members had been “naive” about the work they were doing. “We all went into it knowing that the council was going to draw the lines the way they saw fit,” Wallace said. “It’s just disappointing that what they’ve come up with may not serve some of the communities (of interest) that (the committee) had really tried to consider.”

Bigelow presents two redistricting options in YLP
Sierra Star
Madera County Supervisor Frank Bigelow and planning department staff presented a pair of options for redrawing the county's districts at a meeting at the Yosemite Lakes Park Clubhouse Monday. The new lines will be drawn as a result of information gleaned from last year's census. According to the data, Madera County attracted about 27,000 new residents between 2000 and 2010. The board opted to remove the prison population in District 2 from the count, bringing the total population to 143,549. The planning department's goal was to have each district within three to five percent of 28,710 residents.

New districts could shape future politics
Sign On San Diego
A preliminary map that would influence San Diego politics for the next decade by reshaping the boundaries of City Council districts could pose future problems for a few sitting politicians and leave the Asian-American community longing for a voice at City Hall.

Board of Supes passes redistricting map
Santa Ynez Valley Journal
Santa Barbara County’s redistricting process was off to a promising start when it began in May: The county allowed the public to participate in the complex map-drawing procedure, which yielded 16 maps and seven public meetings to ensure transparency and fairness. County leaders seemed apprehensive that the wonky, unavoidably political complex issue would get tangled up in a lawsuit, as it did in 2001, or spark another attempt at a North County secession, which failed at the ballot box in 2007.

County continues redistricting discussion
Elk Grove Citizen
When members of the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors discussed redistricting at their July 26 meeting, they cut the number of plans under consideration in half, going from six to three. County officials have to redraw the county supervisors’ district lines based on population figures gathered in the 2010 Census. They aim to balance the populations in each district to 282,000 residents.

South Coast self-interest, poor policy
Santa Maria Times
The redrawing of supervisors’ districts seemed to have been a slam-dunk foregone conclusion — despite howls of protest from North County’s two supervisors, and a chorus of boos and hisses from voters at this end of the county who face disenfranchisement. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd district supervisors first rubber-stamped a map drawn up by a regular campaign donor to South Coast politicians, relented after protests from the north, then rubber-stamped a map drawn up by the 1st District supervisor.

County redistricting committee still talking; Some maps to drastically change districts
Redwood Times
While some changes suggested for district lines won’t impact much of the county, others move entire communities -- including Rio Dell, Blue Lake, Fieldbrook and Cutten -- from their current districts. The redistricting committee, appointed by the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors, meets Monday to continue reviewing and tweaking proposed maps. Proposed changes range from straightening the line in Eureka between the 1st and 4th districts by splitting the districts down Harris Street, to creating a geographically large rural horseshoe-shaped district that would group Fortuna and Rio Dell with Cutten and Ridgewood.

Council members to represent current districts for now
Fox 5 San Diego
The City Charter calls for the eight current members of the City Council to continue to represent their districts until the winner of next year's election for the new ninth district is sworn in, according to a legal memorandum released Wednesday by City Attorney Jan Goldsmith. Redistricting, done every 10 years to adjust council boundaries in accordance with updated U.S. census data, is especially complicated this time because not only are the lines being redrawn, but the ninth district is being added.

New Contra Costa County redistricting plan shows little common sense
Contra Costa Times
While Antioch has been working for years to eliminate the divide between "Old Antioch" and "New Antioch," in comes the county Board of Supervisors that has placed Antioch into two new supervisorial districts. Generally, the area north of Highway 4 will be in District 5 while the remainder of Antioch will be in District 3. Three other cities were also split, and none of this was necessary. Now the bulk of Antioch has a supervisor, who during the months of discussions over different maps alluded that she did not want Antioch. So I wonder what kind of "Welcome Wagon" our city leaders are going to extend our new supervisor. I'm sure that they will be polite, but not overly excited.

Redistricting Commission To Meet Today
10News.com
With just 10 days remaining before a final vote is to be taken on new City Council district boundaries, the city of San Diego's Redistricting Commission will meet Monday. The commissioners are expected to view a new map that makes two adjustments, and proposes a third, to the preliminary boundaries.

Humboldt County supervisors to take closer look at local redistricting
Times-Standard
With many of the more dramatic local redistricting changes happening in the 1st and 2nd districts, supervisors Clif Clendenen and Jimmy Smith are prepared to take a closer look on Tuesday. ”It's a good start, but there's more to do,” 2nd District Supervisor Clendenen said about his first impression of the maps. First District Supervisor Smith echoed the sentiment, saying that he is looking forward to the redistricting committee's presentation.

Small Med Center neighborhood at core of fierce council redistricting fight
The Sacramento Bee
Which City Council district should represent the residential enclave wedged between Oak Park and the UC Davis Medical Center? The quiet, tree-lined neighborhood – historically part of Oak Park but more recently renamed Med Center – has been nestled in the same City Council seat as Oak Park for the past 40 years. But a redistricting plan the council is poised to adopt later this month would shift its 1,000 or so residents to the district that includes Elmhurst, Tahoe Park and other neighborhoods on the city's southeast side.

Supervisors select redistricting map
AppealDemocrat.com
On a 5-0 vote, Yuba County supervisors selected a slightly altered version of a proposed map for redrawing county supervisorial districts. After reviewing three proposals last week, supervisors preferred the third, but wanted to see lines drawn between the Third and Fourth districts to put both into an expected growth area along Highway 65, south of Olivehurst.

Tim Hunt: A tale of two cities
The Oakland Tribune
The maps, set to be approved Monday by the citizens' redistricting commission, put McNerney into the same district as the long-in-the-tooth Rep. Pete Stark, a resident of the Washington, D.C., suburbs in Maryland who currently "represents" the 13 District (McNerney's district currently is the 11th). He's been in Congress since 1972. The logical new maps put much of Alameda County into what's currently Stark's district, undoing the bipartisan gerrymandering of the prior legislative redistricting that had the 11th District running from Elk Grove through some of Stockton to the Livermore and San Ramon valleys and south to Morgan Hill.

New coalitions: The politics of redistricting
Jewish Journal
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, who govern the most populous county in America, are entering a critical debate over redistricting that pits Latino empowerment against the stability of district lines. The nature of the board’s majority is also at stake. Los Angeles County’s redistricting process is governed by state law and the county charter. State law (the elections code) allows the board to establish an advisory commission on redistricting, which the board did. Each supervisor chose two members. Now that the commission’s report has been submitted, the Board of Supervisors has until Nov. 1 to approve a decennial redistricting plan. The county charter requires a two-thirds vote, meaning four out of five supervisors must agree on a plan.

Hearing Held for Additional Latino District
San Fernando Valley Sun
Activists who want a second Los Angeles County political district with a Latino majority made their case before the Board of Supervisors today, with 1st District Supervisor Gloria Molina calling the county's proposed redistricting plan "unconstitutional." The county's redistricting plan, recommended by the Boundary Review Committee, was decried by several speakers, including Molina, who said it was "unconstitutional and disenfranchisement of the Latino community." Last year's census showed that Latinos make up 48 percent of the county population, up from 45 percent in 2000, and constitute more than a third of the county's potential voters.

From the Twitterverse

@OC_Breeze- New at OCB: California Citizens Redistricting Commission to vote on final map- http://www.oc-breeze.com/2011/08/15/california-citizens-redistricting-commission-to-vote-on-final-maps/

@CA_Report- New California redistricting maps to be revealed: A final vote is planned on new redistricting maps for Californ... bit.ly/qRc9Co

@Calitics Calitics- It's Redistricting Day!: Redistricting Commission votes on final maps today by Brian Leubitz "Paying o... bit.ly/ogqS02

@CalPoliticsRSS- Progress Report: California’s Great Redistricting Mirage dlvr.it/gGbTy

@watchsonoma- Supes approve #redistricting plan that divvies up Fountaingrove area of north #SantaRosa http://bit.ly/pZ1pRp