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Tax increase, crime measures backed by state voters, poll finds  
Filipa A. Ioannou @ sfgate.com

Criminal sentencing reform and an extension on tax increases for high earners are among California‚¬Ä¬ôs November ballot propositions supported by a majority of likely voters, a new Field Poll found. In 2012, a $1 cigarette tax to fund cancer research was defeated by a margin of only 0.4 percentage points. Prop. 56 would redirect the revenue from the cigarette tax ‚¬Ä¬Ē estimated between $1 billion and $1.4 billion ‚¬Ä¬Ē to health care for low-income Californians. Smoking-related illnesses are costly to the state; a 2015 analysis from the California Health Care Foundation found that among Medicare patients, lung cancer was the deadliest and costliest to treat of the four most common cancers. Support from a voting bloc of Democrats, women, young voters, Latinos and parents has driven strong poll numbers for Prop. 57, but 19 percent of voters remain undecided and 21 percent intend to vote ‚¬Ä¬úno.‚¬Ä¬Ě In 2012, voters approved Prop. 36, revising the state‚¬Ä¬ôs 1994 ‚¬Ä¬úthree strikes‚¬Ä¬Ě law that had previously required offenders to serve a life sentence for any third offense committed after two serious or violent felonies. The revenue ‚¬Ä¬Ē between $4 billion and $9 billion a year, depending on the economy and stock market ‚¬Ä¬Ē would be directed to primary and community college education and, in some years, health care. YouGov did not supply a margin of error because opt-in online polls do not easily lend themselves to the calculation of sampling error estimates.
Submitted 18 hours ago by eureka!
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The Nooner for September 27th

 

E-42

Well, that was fun. I have a hangover this morning, even though I no longer drink. I had my own feelings at the end of the show, but I wanted to wait to see what the journalism class and what Politico's "Caucus" of swing-state activists, strategists, and operatives thought. 80% of the Caucus respondents, equally Democrat and Republican believe Hillary won, as do most journalists.

“Trump was an embarrassment,” an Iowa Republican said. “I'd hate to be the guy in the spin room lying about how Trump won the debate.”

“It wasn't close,” a Virginia Republican added. “Sure, our tribal politics will force it to seem somewhat close, but even the most committed of Trump supporters know, deep down, that did not go well.”

Our friend Shane Goldmacher writes "A composed Hillary Clinton got under Donald Trump’s skin during their high-stakes showdown on Monday night, with the Republican nominee persistently interrupting Clinton as she needled him on his business record, the size of his fortune and his relationship with the truth."

WaPo's Chris Cilizza scores the winners and losers. "Trump was simply not prepared well enough for this debate. He regularly struggled to deal with questions he had to know were coming. His answer on his five-year quest to show that President Obama was not born in this country was like watching a car accident in slow motion. His answer on why he wasn't . . .

[full Nooner]

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