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Lee must make enemies if he wants to combat homelessness  
sfgate.com

Lee must make enemies if he wants to combat homelessness With his pronouncement that the homeless will ‚¬Ä¬úhave to leave‚¬Ä¬Ě their encampments on the city‚¬Ä¬ôs streets and sidewalks Mayor Ed Lee has taken his first step away from being the social-worker-style mayor that he has been for the past four years. The guy was going down the street, stopping along the sidewalk and doorways, poking the sleepers and telling them to Get up, get up. No social services. If Lee is serious about getting the chronic inebriates and such off the streets, he is going to have to cross the line and call for the imposition of prolonged stays at residential programs until the homeless who are so out of it they can‚¬Ä¬ôt take care of themselves can get a grip on their lives. [...] if he can prevail, he will receive the eternal gratitude of 600,000 or 700,000 residents of this city, as well as a million visitors who come to work and to play. Trump‚¬Ä¬ôs secret weapon is humor. Trump is the product of the Comedy Central generation. Vice President Joe Biden‚¬Ä¬ôs decision to skip the Democratic party pow-wow in Minnesota this weekend was a clear bow to Hillary Rodham Clinton. [...] has anyone seen Bill Clinton? I‚¬Ä¬ôm starting to think he‚¬Ä¬ôs gone into the witness protection program. Aaron Peskin‚¬Ä¬ôs bid to return to the Board of Supervisors is getting a tremendous boost from both Jack Davis and Rose Pak. [...] for someone who is seriously ill, Rose looked spectacular when I saw her at the opening of the new cafe addition to Sam‚¬Ä¬ôs the other day. [...] it‚¬Ä¬ôs over. Judy and George Marcus, with Darius Anderson and Steven Kay, hosted 30 of their friends to raise money for an internship scholarship program at the Willie B. Brown Institute at San Francisco State University. S.F. State President Leslie Wong made the case for the money and a host of supporters including former Dignity Health CEO Lloyd Dean, California Engineering Contractors President Wahid Tadros, Clint and Janet Reilly, housing developer Oz Erickson, Academy of Art head Elisa Stephens, Lennar Urban excecutive Kofi Bonner, Jimi Harris of PG&E, real estate magnate Alvin Dworman, Victor and Farah Makras, Rusty Areias, Rich Guggenhime and the Giants‚¬Ä¬ô Larry Baer responded with donations totaling $400,000. The generosity prompted real estate magnate and former UC regent George Marcus and wife Judy to match the commitment dollar for dollar, resulting in $800,000 net for the evening. Many students will be the direct beneficiary of this typical San Francisco generosity. The CIA is again put to the task, this time out to eliminate three rogue, stone-cold losers that it had turned into permanent assassins.
Submitted 35 minutes ago by eureka!
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A golden opportunity for France√Ę  
Gary Kamiya @ sfgate.com

On Feb. 28, 1852, a ship from Le Havre sailed through the Golden Gate, rounded Clark‚¬Ä¬ôs Point at what is now Broadway and Battery and unloaded 200 specimens of the finest flotsam and jetsam of France, including criminals, political prisoners, honest workers, the politically connected, dissidents, common thugs and various other types deemed undesirable by the authorities. Between 1851 and 1853, the French government used the proceeds of a huge national lottery, the irresistibly named Lottery of the Golden Ingots, to ship more than 4,000 people to California, hoping that most or all of them would never return. Just weeks after James Marshall discovered gold in Coloma in January 1848, a revolution toppled the French king, Louis-Philippe, ushering in a period of upheaval that climaxed in four terrible days in June when 10,000 people were killed on the barricades of Paris; 25,000 people were arrested and 5,000 deported, most to the French colony in Algeria. To help restore order, get rid of revolutionaries and troublemakers and help some of the country‚¬Ä¬ôs desperately poor people, the authorities decided to encourage emigration to Algeria, Corsica and the French West Indies. The California gold fields not only offered ordinary French citizens potential escape from poverty, chaos and violence, but they handed the French government a literally golden opportunity to solve both a humanitarian and a political problem. The authorities would help poor people get a fresh start, while at the same time sending undesirable elements so far away they would probably never return. The French and the California Gold Rush, 1848-1854, initial skepticism about reports from the American press, which the French derided as the ‚¬Ä¬úAmerican puff,‚¬Ä¬Ě gave way to wild credulity. The California companies fanned the mania with an unprecedented advertising campaign, sometimes buying up all the advertising pages in French newspapers. A company called La Fortune, offering 15,000 shares at 10 francs each and 3,000 shares at 50 francs, said it had just bought four ‚¬Ä¬úalmost miraculous‚¬Ä¬Ě machines, each of which could do the work of 100 men and was ‚¬Ä¬úcapable of extracting 2 kilograms of gold a day.‚¬Ä¬Ě Not to be outdone, another company claimed they too had a machine invented ‚¬Ä¬úby a former university professor‚¬Ä¬Ě and offered a thirtyfold return. A fashion house announced it had just gotten in a large quantity of clothing suitable for emigrants to California ‚¬Ä¬úor any such distant country,‚¬Ä¬Ě while women who wished to remain home in style could purchase a delectable ‚¬Ä¬úchapeau Californien‚¬Ä¬Ě made by one Aimee Henry for 12 francs. La Meuse was the first of dozens of ships that would make the long and dangerous voyage, carrying 30,000 French people to San Francisco. The passengers made up a representative cross-section of the French population, hailing from Paris and the provinces and from all socioeconomic classes. In August 1850, the French government said it would hold a Lottery of the Golden Ingots ‚¬Ä¬Ē a national lottery whose first prize was a gold bar worth 400,000 francs. Every Saturday, Gary Kamiya‚¬Ä¬ôs Portals of the Past tells one of those lost stories, using a specific location to illuminate San Francisco‚¬Ä¬ôs extraordinary history ‚¬Ä¬Ē from the days when giant mammoths wandered through what is now North Beach, to the Gold Rush delirium the dot-com madness and beyond. Devotees of the ‚¬Ä¬úcocktail route‚¬Ä¬Ě dubbed it that because the prevailing winds raised women‚¬Ä¬ôs skirts.
Submitted 6 hours ago by eureka!
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