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November ballot crowded with weighty measures  
sfgate.com

California voters will face a long and weighty list of statewide ballot measures this November €” 17 measures in all made Thursday€™s fall election deadline and they include big decisions on the death penalty, marijuana use and taxes on the wealthy. Among the issues voters will decide are whether Death Row inmates should be executed faster or not at all in two competing measures. Other initiatives would legalize the recreational use of marijuana, require background checks for ammunition sales, overturn a 1998 initiative that banned bilingual instruction in public schools and overhaul the state€™s prison parole rules to allow inmates to be released earlier. Inmates would face life without parole and could, if ordered to, pay 60 percent of wages earned while incarcerated to victim restitution. Opponents say shortening appeals increases the likelihood of executing innocent inmates. The tax, which primarily funds K-12 schools and community colleges, is paid by individuals earning more than $250,000 and couples making more than $500,000. Proponents argue the extension is needed to prevent billions in cuts to schools and vital services, while opponents say Prop. 30 was temporary and should remain that way. The Legislature placed this initiative on the ballot to repeal most of Proposition 227, the 1998 measure that barred bilingual education programs in public schools. Should money charged for paper bags be sent to a special fund for environmental projects? If the plastic bag ban becomes effective, this initiative would require bag fees charged by grocery and retail stores for paper bags to be sent to a fund administered by the Wildlife Conservation Board. Sponsored by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, the measure would also ban possession of large-capacity rifle magazines, require gun owners to notify police when their weapons are lost or stolen and create new procedures for confiscating guns from persons prohibited from possessing them. The initiative would let inmates with nonviolent offenses seek parole after serving time on their primary offense, while erasing secondary offenses or enhancements with good behavior. Should voters authorize $9 billion in general obligation bonds for new school construction and modernization, with $2 billion for community colleges and the rest divided among K-12 districts, charter schools and vocational education? Should the state be barred from issuing more than $2 billion in public infrastructure bonds without voter approval if repaying those bonds would require an increase in taxes or fees? Supporters say the initiative ensures the state doesn€™t have a blank check while opponents, like the governor, say it would result in costly delays in repairing roads, buildings and water systems. The proposition would make producers, distributors, talent agents and in some cases performers liable for violations. Should lawmakers wait 72 hours after a bill is made public before voting on it except in cases of a public emergency? Should the amount state agencies pay for a prescription drug be capped to match what the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs pays? Supporters say the measure would lower drug prices on lifesaving treatments, while opponents say the measure would reduce the availability of some drugs and impact research on new drugs. The controversial 2010 U.S. Supreme Court ruling opened the door for unlimited spending by corporations and unions in federal candidate campaigns. Should lawmakers be required to meet a two-thirds majority vote €” instead of a simple majority vote €” when they divert Medi-Cal fees meant to fund health care for the state€™s poor?
Submitted 2 hours ago by eureka!
Libertarian candidate brings presidential campaign to SF  
sfgate.com

Libertarian candidate brings presidential campaign to SF The Libertarian Party€™s nominee for president visited San Francisco on Thursday, extolling the virtues of small government and saying 2016 might be the year his minor party plays a major role in the national campaign. [...] Johnson, 63, has faced larger audiences of late €” he and his vice-presidential running mate, former Massachusetts Gov. William Weld, have appeared on a CNN €œtown hall€ and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. In terms of issues, Johnson emphasized libertarian positions likely to resonate with the crowd at the event organized by the Lincoln Initiative, which bills itself as working to bridge €œthe generational gap between the conservative political community and the technology community.€ €œI think we really need to be open to a debate and a discussion about how we keep guns out of the hands of the mentally ill, and of terrorists,€ he said before criticizing measures proposed by Democrats that would ban gun sales to people on no-fly lists, or restrict certain types of ammunition. In his conversation on-stage with Politico€™s Carla Marinucci, Johnson was most comfortable applying Libertarian critiques to a domestic scene where, he suggested, governments at all scales are too eager to intervene. The burden of college debts on young adults? €œThe main reason for high tuition is guaranteed government loans,€ Johnson said. If San Francisco were serious about this issue, it would take a six-acre site and build 30,000 units on that site,€ Johnson said afterwards, hearkening back to a scenario he laid out during his talk: €œWithout rules, regulations, zoning, what they come up with €” there wouldn€™t be a need for rent control because housing would be so incredibly affordable.
Submitted 6 hours ago by eureka!
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The Nooner for June 30th

 

Happy June 30! Today is the deadline for legislative measures to qualify for the November ballot, as well as the last day for proponents of qualified initiatives to withdraw them. It's also (likely) the last day of the legislative session until the Legislature reconvenes August 1.

THE READ DU JOUR: At the corner of power and poverty [Laurel Rosenhall @ CALmatters] - "Bridging these two worlds is Debbie Bartley, a 55-year-old grandmother who stands across the street selling Homeward, a newspaper produced by homeless people. She chats with the political staffers and lobbyists who give her a few dollars as they pass by. Then she buys food for people who sleep on these streets."

A few months ago, I was working at the tables outside of Chicory. I had ignored Bartley's "sales" pitch for years. Then, I watched as she tended to the down-trodden panhandling within the table area. "You can't do that in here," she said and escorted them out. I've always been a "I gave at the office" type of person, but her compassion for all involved made me want to buy as many papers from her as possible.

It's a strange day in the Capitol, with guns at the center, as parliamentary procedure rules take over in the debate over gun regulations, oddly with Republicans arguing in favor of Gavin Newsom's gun initiative.

 

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Randle Com . . .<br><br><p align=center><a href=[full Nooner]

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