more headlines >>
Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement
SF√Ę  
sfgate.com

Pumping rhythms of samba, salsa and cumbia filled the air as the 38th annual San Francisco Carnaval Parade kicked off Sunday morning with a procession of feathered and sometimes scantily clad dancers celebrating multiculturalism, great food, music ‚¬Ä¬Ē and a love for Mother Earth. While the annual two-day festival in the heart of the Mission District is ultimately about bringing community together through music and dance, this year it built on 2015‚¬Ä¬ôs theme of water conservation and urged greater awareness of the fragility of the environment all around us. Serving as the parade‚¬Ä¬ôs grand marshal was labor organizer, farmworker rights advocate and 2012 National Medal of Freedom recipient Dolores Huerta. In addition to her labor efforts, Huerta was also an early critic of the use of toxic pesticides and their effects on field workers and the food chain. Carnaval king and queen Kianna Rachal and Carlos Venturo led the parade this year, and among the 70 participating groups marching down the street was San Francisco‚¬Ä¬ôs recycling and waste disposal company, Recology ‚¬Ä¬Ē whose members danced along in a lighthearted routine featuring recycling bins. [...] festival organizers handed out free water bottles to encourage people to reduce waste, and clothespins to promote energy conservation by taking advantage of the Mission‚¬Ä¬ôs sunny climate for line-drying clothes. The usual sprinkling of freebies handed out to the crowds also included one truly sensible type this year: 2,000 reusable Carnaval-themed shopping bags, to encourage people to break the old habit of just using bags from stores. Another undercurrent in the festivities was gentrification‚¬Ä¬ôs effect on the Mission, and the efforts by community groups including Our Mission No Eviction to preserve the district‚¬Ä¬ôs heritage as new residents pour in. With that in mind, festival organizers said they brought in thousands of dancers and drummers, many of whom have been displaced from their homes because of the neighborhood‚¬Ä¬ôs gentrification woes.
Submitted 6 hours ago by eureka!
more headlines >>


The Nooner for May 29th

 

Good Sunday morning, Noonerific people. It was a beautiful morning as I woke up naturally, got out of bed, enjoying the overnight cool-down that dissipated yesterday's heat, and flipped on the coffee pot. The hour of 6am having arrived, I flipped on the boob tube, and Chuck Todd's head had exploded into a bunch of GoBots driving around Monaco. If it's Sunday, it's Meet the Press.*

*subject to preemption by some European sporting event.

Some readers might have felt my rant yesterday against Donald Trump was a rant against his candidacy, which I keep out of The Nooner (but you might find on Facebook). Rather, it was for saying something stupid about California, and if Clinton or Sanders did the same, a policy takedown would ensue.

Well, mail boxes are being filled with mail by groups seeking to influence the June 7 top-two primary. The vast majority of independent expenditures are seeking to buoy Democrats, in some cases primarily to prop up a candidate to avoid a Dem-on-Dem general in November.

The largest fights are between charter school and education reform groups (Charter Schools Association and EdVoice) and education labor groups.

The biggest single has been EdVoice's $1.4 million in support of Bill Dodd's campaign to replace Lois Wolk in SD03. Dodd is facing off against former Assemblymember Mariko Yamada in the Napa-Solano-Yolo district. Dodd, elected in 2014 to the Assembly is seen as one of the most conservative Assembly Democrats. Yamada was termed out of the lower house in 2014. Unlike in other races, labor has provided only minimal independent support to Yamada's campaign.

Meanwhile, charter school advocates also top the list. The Charter School A . . .

[full Nooner]

ElectionTrack Latest

[full list]