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Homeless shelter plan pits Bayview against City Hall  
sfgate.com

Bayview-Hunters Point residents and business owners are fuming over the city's proposal to build a 100-bed shelter in their neighborhood - and what they say is the lack of official response to their concerns. What they're upset about is a plan to turn a warehouse next to Mother Brown's Kitchen, a drop-in center at 2111 Jennings St., into a homeless shelter that could sleep up to 100 people per night. The big-picture issue here is that as a practical matter, the city has committed itself to this project before it has followed the required legal procedure, including an obligation to invite public comment through public hearings," said Steven Hammond, the attorney representing the residents and businesses, which include Micro-Tracers Inc., Stanislaus Imports and Evergood Sausage Co. "This lawsuit goes to that issue. In documents filed in response to the suit, state and city attorneys wrote that there are no legal grounds for stopping the project's funding. A place to sleepWhen she proposed that the city put a shelter in the warehouse next door to the soup kitchen, "all I was trying to do was get my people in some beds so they can lie down and sleep at night," she said. In the afternoons, homeless men, women and families trek down Van Dyke Avenue toward Mother Brown's for dinner, which starts at 5 p.m. The kitchen serves about 300 a night, Westbrook said. Upstairs at Mother Brown's, nearly 50 people stay in plastic lawn chairs overnight, but since it's a drop-in shelter, they aren't allowed to sleep: According to city data, homelessness in the neighborhood has risen dramatically.
Submitted 3 hours ago by eureka!
Here's why the S.F. Marathon was a mess  
sfgate.com

The computer app that was supposed to allow family and friends to track runners didn't work, water was unavailable on parts of the course and race officials are still trying to sort out the confusion about the winner of the women's division of the first half-marathon. In response, Peter Nantell, who's directed the event for the last 13 years, sent a statement to The Chronicle. [...] he added, We are aware that water delivery for some water locations was delayed, causing low water levels. [...] Jenni Kirk, president of the San Francisco Road Runners, ran the full marathon and says she saw more than one runner passed out on the ground in the hot weather. Even if there are problems with the event - officials issued an apology for the defective tracking app before the race even began - there is still the draw of a beautiful city and a race course that includes a jog over the Golden Gate Bridge. Promotion seen as lackingThis should not only be an impressive event, it should be a magnet for tourists. In my humble opinion, says Len Goldman, former president of the Lake Merritt Joggers and Striders, they seem to have had their share of issues with putting on a quality product. Officials have given conflicting accounts of who won the women's division of the first half-marathon. First they insisted the first runner across the finish line, Stephanie Knast, was the winner, even if another racer, Stephanie Hamm, had a faster time according to her computer chip. [...] they revised the times for the first three runners, including Knast, lopping off over two minutes to reflect the fact that they started after the elite runners took off for the full marathon. Timing issuesMeanwhile, Becky Ikenberry, an executive with Race Central, the timing company, said they didn't find out that the first-half-marathon racers would be starting in the second wave at the start until the race started at 5:30 on the morning.
Submitted 3 hours ago by eureka!
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The Nooner for August 1st

Well, kids, it's the last day of summer recess. I hope you had a Noonerific break and are ready for the final sprint of session. For those homegamers, the Legislature returns on Monday and will work bills through August 31. The governor then has until September 30 to act on bills passed in the final 12 days of session.

The Bee's AM Alert notes that the State Senate's fundraising blackout extends from today through the end of session. The State Senators who are affected most because they are on the ballot this November include:

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[full list]