more headlines >>
Advertisement

Advertisement
Protecting homes central to both sides of landlord-tenant battle  
sfgate.com

The liberal-leaning Board of Supervisors has passed at least seven laws since last spring geared toward stabilizing the rental market and protecting tenants vulnerable to no-fault evictions, such as those conducted under the state Ellis Act, which lets landlords kick out tenants if they want to exit the rental business. Another handful of proposals is in the pipeline, including a November ballot measure that seeks to render real estate speculation less attractive by assessing a hefty tax on the sale of a multiunit building within five years of its purchase and a legislative proposal that would regulate the shadowy market of tenant buyouts, in which landlords offer renters sums of cash to vacate a unit. Laws fail to make dentYet while landlords and tenants - and their lawyers - fight over the legality of these laws, none seems to be curbing the city's rapidly rising real estate costs or making a huge dent in the number of tenants being forced to leave San Francisco. While Ellis Act and other no-fault evictions - under which landlords may evict tenants who have done nothing wrong - make up a small percentage of the city's roughly 2,000 annual evictions, they have surged in recent years as the housing market has heated up, and become a symbol of the city's growing inequality. Jacoby first attempted use the city's owner move-in law - which lets property owners evict tenants so they or a relative can move in - to get Barrett out. [...] Barrett has taken Jacoby to court over the unit's conditions and, successfully, to the city's Rent Board for overcharging her for rent. Eventually, Jacoby filed an Ellis Act eviction - and while it was pending, Supervisor David Campos' tenant relocation assistance legislation became law June 1, retroactively bumping up the amount of money Jacoby was required to pay Barrett from around $20,000 to more than $200,000. Shortly after, Jacoby filed a lawsuit against the city and Barrett, saying the relocation statute violates state law, cannot be enforced and unfairly focuses on one type of eviction, making it a "surcharge for invoking a politically disfavored state right." Naylor, a jazz singer, hosts Buddhist chants at her home daily while her husband gives music lessons to children in the unit. Upton, executive director of an anti-domestic-violence organization, sits on numerous official city panels and is one of the first people police and prosecutors call after a domestic violence tragedy.
Submitted 16 hours ago by eureka!
Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement
more headlines >>

The Nooner for August 29th

n called the most civilized end-of-session in memory by some. Straight-up boring by others. Whatever your thoughts, the 2014 legislative session is winding to a close, with relatively little drama left in the closing hours.

Groundwater is still the big unknown, but a revised proposal is heading back for a floor vote after clearing the Appropriations committee last night. The split is still mostly but not entirely party-line, with some Central Valley Democrats still voicing concerns over the plan.

Meanwhile, the Legislature a proposed ban on single-use plastic bags cleared the Assembly on Thursday, three days after voting down the exact same bill.

Scott Detrow reports, “What had changed, however, was that a powerful union had shifted its stance on the measure. And when the bill was called to a vote several minutes later, it had picked up six additional Democratic votes – enough to pass. The legislation will likely see a final vote in the Senate on Friday.

“The bill’s brief death, swift resurrection and muddled reasons for renewed life are emblematic of the behind-the-scenes negotiations that dominate the final days of a legislative session.

“So what happened? California’s United Food and Commercial Workers Union had voiced “serious concerns” about the latest version of the bag ban before Monday’s initial Assembly vote. UFCW’s problem: Recent amendments allow stores to keep proceeds from the 10-cent fee charged for paper or reusable bags given to customers. In a letter to lawmakers, the union wrote it was worried the bill lacked a “serious enforcement mechanism” to make sure stores were spending the money properly.

But on Wednesday, the union was back to supporting the measure.”

Plastic bags would still likely be legal in the . . .

[full Nooner]

ElectionTrack Latest

[full list]