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GENERAL ELECTION DATA POINTS

The Nooner for Wednesday, October 14, 2020, presented by SYASL Partners

  • The vote
  • Ballot boxes
  • Census
  • Money matters
  • COVID-19
  • Fires
  • PG&E shutoff outlook
  • Prop. 21
  • Prop. 22
  • Prop. 23
  • CA50 (East San Diego County)
  • CA49 (S. OC/N. SD counties)
  • Policing
  • Flavored tobacco
  • Latino Legislative Caucus
  • Cakeday and classifieds

Happy humpday, if that means anything in 2020. Anyway, the deluge of campaign finance reports will continue through the weekend so that's my "hot date." It's not like I'll be going to the movies or heading to Levi's Stadium for the Rams at Niners game Sunday evening. There don't seem to be as many leaves falling this morning and thus my lungs are doing better, although I'm wary of the winds expected this afternoon.

I've been avoiding the Barrett hearings despite my fandom of the Supreme Court. Instead, I've had The West Wing on during the 16 hours at my desk. From what I have seen on Twitter, etc., I think this is better for my mental health. After all, I know the ending of both the Barrett hearings and The West Wing.

I did step away from the 'puter at Nooner Global Headquarters last night to wind down and drink some Sweet Dream tea from Allspicery. I watched my first episode of the new Netflix documentary spinoff of the Song Exploder podcast, one of my favorite non-political, non-tech pods. Created and mostly hosted by Hrishikesh Hirway, the podcast takes one song for each episode and dissects it's creation with those who created it. Of course I learned about the podcast because Hrishi is the co-host of the awesome "The West Wing Weekly" podcast with Joshua Malina ("Will Bailey").

The outstanding musician Thao Nguyen guest hosted for a year as Hrishi worked on other projects (a composer and musician in his own right). Since 2014, the pod has dissected songs twice a week ranging from Metallica to The Cranberries after the unexpected death of singer Dolores O’Riordan -- you undoubtedly know her voice if you hear it -- "Zombie, Zombie..."

Anyway, the remaining members of The Cranberries used tapes she recorded at home provided to them by her boyfriend and created the song "All Over Now" and released it posthumously.

I remember walking to the Capitol with tears in my eyes listening to the episode, but it was fantastic.

The new Netflix series has four episodes and I started of course with R.E.M.'s "Losing My Religion," because of the timing it entered my life. It was absolutely fabulous. Tonight I will wind down with another one. The rest are Alicia Keys "Three-Hour Drive," Lin-Manuel Miranda "Wait For It" from Hamilton, and Ty Dolla $ign - "LA."

I am not one to make music, but to hear these artists talk about the creative process is simply amazing.

On to California politics and policy...

THE VOTE: Here is the latest from Political Data's ballot tracker. Topline is 21,508,716 ballots were mailed, with a breakdown of Dem: 43.4%, Rep: 24.2%, and NPP/other: 29.4%. Thus far, 1,169,492 have been returned (5%). Partisan breakdown of returned ballots is Dem: 7%, Rep: 5%, NPP/other: 4% of ballots mailed.

The PDI site has breakdowns by congressional and state legislative districts (click "Select for Filters") and a list of the top 25 districts searched.

BALLOT BOXES: For Politico, Carla Marinucci reports on President Trump's encouragement for the California GOP to stand by its plan for what state officials deem to be unlawful ballot collection.

President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Tuesday to urge the California Republican Party to “fight on” in its move to collect ballots in unofficial “drop boxes’’ around the state, in defiance of legal threats from state officials.

Trump’s comments come a day after top California officials sent the state party a cease-and-desist notice, ordering them to remove the unofficial ballot drop boxes. The appearance of the boxes prompted Gov. Gavin Newsom to accuse California Republicans of being “willing to lie, cheat and threaten our democracy all for the sake of gaining power.”

Trump, in a Tuesday tweet, wrote, "You mean only Democrats are allowed to do this? But haven’t the Dems been doing this for years? See you in court. Fight hard Republicans!”

...

Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), appearing on Central Valley radio station KMJ Tuesday, had a terse response to Newsom: “Screw you! You created the law, we’re going to ballot harvest,’’ he said on “The Ray Appleton Show.”

CENSUS: Yesterday, the Supreme Court of the United States yesterday granted the Trump Administration's request to stay the preliminary injunction granted by Northern District of California judge Lucy Koh, which was upheld by a three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit. The order allows the Administration to immediately stop counting nonrespondents. The order is one paragraph and unsigned, while Justice Sotomayor offered a dissenting opinion, concluding:

The Government has not satisfied its “especially heavy burden” to justify a stay pending appeal of the lower court’s injunction. Packwood v. Senate Select Comm. on Ethics, 510 U. S. 1319, 1320 (1994) (Rehnquist, C. J., in chambers). Because the harms associated with an inaccurate census are avoidable and intolerable, I respectfully dissent from the grant of stay.

James Romoser reports for SCOTUSblog:

The administration said last week in an emergency request to the justices that it needs to wind down the census count right away in order to have enough time to process the census data and meet a key statutory deadline at the end of the year. A group of local governments and nonprofit groups, led by the National Urban League, said that ending the count early will result in an undercount of immigrants, low-income people and other groups that are difficult to count.

...

The dispute involved census field operations, which became delayed this year as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. To cope with the delay, the department initially released a plan to continue field operations through all of October – but it later revised that plan and sought to end field operations on Sept. 30 instead.

...

President Donald Trump wants to exclude unauthorized immigrants from the totals that are used for reapportionment – a change that could shift political power to states with low immigrant populations. Trump’s plan to exclude unauthorized immigrants is the subject of a separate lawsuit currently pending before the Supreme Court. The justices are scheduled to discuss it at their private conference on Friday.

Obviously, the issue on unauthorized immigrants would significantly impact California in reapportionment.

Following yesterday's ruling, the Census Bureau announced that "As of today, well over 99.9% of housing units have been accounted for in the 2020 Census. Self-response and field data collection operations for the 2020 Census will conclude on October 15, 2020."

Critics argue that "household units" do not account for homeless and transient individuals, such as those affected by wildfires.

MONEY MATTERS:

Independent expenditures

  • SD15 (San José): $198,201 for TV ads to SUPPORT Ann Ravel (D-D race) by Silicon Valley JobsPAC, sponsored by the California Chamber of Commerce (Cumulative total: $1,085,235)
  • SD15 (San José): $132,134 for TV ads to OPPOSE Dave Cortese (D-D race) by Silicon Valley JobsPAC, sponsored by the California Chamber of Commerce (Cumulative total: $641,609)
  • SD23 (Rancho Cucamonga-Redlands-Hemet): $44,792 for mail in SUPPORT of Rosalicie Ochoa Bogh (R) by California Dental Association (Cumulative total: $93,159)
  • SD23 (Rancho Cucamonga-Redlands-Hemet): $62,578 for mail in SUPPORT of Rosalicie Ochoa Bogh (R) by California Association of Hospitals and Health Systems 
  • SD23 (Rancho Cucamonga-Redlands-Hemet): $4,047 for mail in SUPPORT of Rosalicie Ochoa Bogh (R) by California Correctional Peace Officers Association (Cumulative total: $38,876)
  • SD23 (Rancho Cucamonga-Redlands-Hemet): $63,100 for TV ads in SUPPORT of Rosalicie Ochoa Bogh (R) by Coalition to Restore California's Middle Class, Including Energy Companies who Produce Gas, Oil, Jobs and Pay Taxes (Cumulative total: $234,029)
  • SD23 (Rancho Cucamonga-Redlands-Hemet): $252,400 for TV ads to OPPOSE Abigail Medina (D) by Coalition to Restore California's Middle Class, Including Energy Companies who Produce Gas, Oil, Jobs and Pay Taxes (Cumulative total: $234,029)
  • SD23 (Rancho Cucamonga-Redlands-Hemet): $34,599 for mail to OPPOSE Abigail Medina (D) by California Correctional Peace Officers Association (Cumulative total: $107,474)
  • SD29 (Diamond Bar-Fullerton): $5,541 for web ads in SUPPORT of Ling Ling Chang (R) by California Alliance for Progress and Education, an alliance of business organizations (Cumulative total: $574,341)
  • SD37 (Anaheim Hills-Irvine-OC beach cities): $6,880 for mail in SUPPORT of Dave Min (D) by California Professional Firefighters (Cumulative total: $13,760)
  • SD37 (Anaheim Hills-Irvine-OC beach cities): $102,892 for mail to OPPOSE John M.W. Moorlach by California Correctional Peace Officers Association (Cumulative total: $210,674)
  • AD13 (Stockton): $40,356 for digital ads in SUPPORT of Carlos Villapudua (D-D race) by Coalition to Restore California's Middle Class, Including Energy Companies who Produce Gas, Oil, Jobs and Pay Taxes (Cumulative total: $1,017,003)
  • AD13 (Stockton): $114,090 for mailer, digital ads to OPPOSE Kathy Miller (D-D race) by Coalition to Restore California's Middle Class, Including Energy Companies who Produce Gas, Oil, Jobs and Pay Taxes (Cumulative total: $189,336)
  • AD42 (Cathedral City, Tweny-Nine Palms, Yucaipa): $7,126 for mail to OPPOSE Chad Mayes (NPP) by American Matters Political Action Committee
  • AD48 (West Covina): $21,026 for mail in SUPPORT of Blanca Rubio (D) by Californians Allied for Patient Protection  
  • AD57 (Whittier): $21,323 for mail in SUPPORT of Lisa Calderon (D) by Californians Allied for Patient Protection
  • AD59 (South Los Angeles): $141,223 for TV ads in SUPPORT of Efren Martinez (D-D race) by Coalition for Safe Communities Committee, supporting Martinez for Assembly 2020, committee major funding from Peace Officers Research Association of California (Cumulative title: $413,209); In the filing, dialysis clinic operator also added $249,000 to PORAC's $250,000. 
  • AD59 (South Los Angeles): $7,758 for robocalls in SUPPORT of Efren Martinez (D-D race) by Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs 
  • AD68 (Irvine): $22,733 for mail to OPPOSE Melissa Fox (D) by Keeping Californians Working, a Coalition of Housing Providers, Energy and Insurance Agents (Cumulative total: $205,909)

Large ballot measure contributions

Doing the Laundry 
If you're new to this game, this is how special interests can far exceed the $4,700 contribution limit for the November general. I explained the process on 9/15. After passing max $38,800 contributions through party committees, those committees can pass the money along far in excess of the $4,700. It's "washed" as long as the original donor doesn't "direct" the money. Of course, we all know the competitive races. I list them for ATCpro subscribers.

MONEY IN

  •  None reported yesterday

MONEY OUT

  • The Democratic Party of Mendocino County: $30,000 to Dawn Addis (AD35 - San Luis Obispo County)
  • The Democratic Central Committee of Marin: $30,000 to Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen (AD72 - Orange County)
  • Del Norte County Democratic Central Committee: $50,000 to Andrew Rodriguez (AD55 - LA/Orange County)

These don't include state party money. It's just "fun" to watch the flow. The Republican Party doesn't have much of this activity which would be a good panel discussion to explore why. I have my thoughts. Of course, California's GOP has far less money to go around these days.

All in the game, yo'.

COVID-19: California added 69 deaths yesterday for a total of 16,657.

-Reopening: Yesterday was another reopening Tuesday -- for ten counties. Colusa, Kern, Kings, San Benito, Stanislaus, and Sutter counties moved from Purple to Red. Alameda, Placer, and Santa Clara counties moved from the Red to Orange tier. Sierra moved from Orange to Yellow, the lowest-level tier. Here is the page with the explanation of tiers and a searchable database of the status of each county and what the restrictions are.

In the Times, Colleen Shelby looks at why Los Angeles County is still stuck in the strictest tier while Orange and Ventura have moved to Red.

Los Angeles County public health officials said Tuesday that an uptick in coronavirus cases linked to social gatherings and workplace outbreaks is largely keeping the area from moving out of the state’s most restrictive tier for reopening.

While officials remain hopeful the county will be able to progress in California’s reopening plan in the coming weeks, the area is still firmly in Tier 1, or the purple zone — one of only 10 counties in the state still considered to have a widespread risk of community transmission.

Though the county’s positivity rate has dropped to 3.7%, it has been hindered by a high number of coronavirus cases. The metric has been driven largely by outbreaks from personal gatherings, Public Health Directors Barbara Ferrer said during a Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday.

“The only way we get to Tier 2 is to really double down,” Ferrer said about the county’s goal to move to the next tier. “We’re going to have to get used to living our lives with a different set of rules.”

-Boo. Not, BOO! California is strongly discouraging traditional Halloween activities as public health leaders try to make continued progress in lower the COVID-19 case numbers. Aidin Vaziri writes for the Chron:

“The safest way to celebrate is at home with your household, or virtually,” Dr. Mark Ghaly, California health and human services secretary, said during a press briefing on Tuesday.

The state recommends that people avoid activities such as door-to-door trick-or-treating, attending indoor costume parties or gathering with large groups different households, which may increase the risk of spreading the coronavirus.

“COVID-19 continues to pose an important risk,” Ghaly said, noting that even though California’s case rates and hospitalization numbers may be on a downtrend, the surges in other parts of the country and across the world are of concern. “We’re not out of the woods.”

-Strip clubs: In the SDUT, Gustavo Solis writes that under the guidelines, strip clubs can open to serve food with the same occupancy limits as restaurants, but there can't be dancing.

From a regulatory standpoint, strip clubs can be considered three different types of businesses depending on how they operate. Clubs can be live entertainment venues, bars, and/or restaurants.

Under the current state and county health orders, restaurants are allowed to operate with some restrictions, but bars and live entertainment venues cannot.

That makes it difficult for the city to simply order all of them to shut down.

“There is no hard and fast rule that they have to be closed,” said San Diego Police Department Lt. Shawn Takeuchi.

So, if a strip club has a kitchen and a menu, they can stay open as a restaurant and serve $2 steak specials or all-you-can-eat wing deals on Sundays.

But strip clubs are not allowed to operate as bars or live entertainment venues.

Do they have normal lighting without dancing or is it like when Space Mountain breaks down and they turn on all the lights?

FIRES:

  • August Fire (Mendocino, Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Glenn, Lake, Colusa counties) 1,029,110 acres, 76% contained as of 8:21am
    • 54 structures destroyed
  • Creek Fire (Fresno, Madera counties) 337,655 acres, 55% contained as of 8:06am
    • 856 structures destroyed
  • SQF Complex (Tulare County) 167,388 acres, 70% contained as of 10/12 9:25am
    • 228 structures destroyed
  • Glass Fire (Napa, Sonoma counties) 67,484 acres, 95% contained as of 10/12 9:16am
    • 1,555 structures destroyed

PG&E SHUTOFF OUTLOOK: The public safety power shutoffs in parts of PG&E's service territory, if triggered, are expected to begin this evening and could last through Friday. The forecast map has been updated.

Here are the times estimated for the affected areas by county (reflected on the map). Data retrieved at 0600 on 10/14 and are obviously subject to wide changes. However, under scrutiny for fires in previous years and required to report by 10/26to the federal judge overseeing the company's probation originating in the 2010 San Bruno gas explosion about possible equipment involvement in the Shasta County Zogg Fire that has claimed 4 lives and 204 structures and which was fully contained yesterday, it is likely that it will be extremely cautious in this event.

  • Alameda
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 8pm-1am
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 5,405
  • Amador
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 8pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 57
  • Butte
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 6pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 11,315
  • Calaveras
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 8pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 262
  • Contra Costa
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 8pm-1am
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 929
  • El Dorado
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 9pm-10am
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 1,654
  • Humboldt
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 10/15 4pm-6pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 187
  • Lake
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 6pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 82
  • Monterey
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 8pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 1,084
  • Napa
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 6pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 9,230
  • Nevada
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 7pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 224
  • Placer
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 9pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 389
  • Plumas
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 6pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 1,855
  • San Mateo
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 8pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 1,683
  • Santa Clara
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 8pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 810
  • Santa Cruz
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 8pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 6,024
  • Shasta
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 7pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 4,696
  • Sierra
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 9pm-10pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 1,052
  • Solano
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 6pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 870
  • Sonoma
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 6pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 1,781
  • Tehama
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 7pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 1,230
  • Trinity
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 10/15 4pm-6pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 168
  • Yolo
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 6pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 10
  • Yuba
    • Estimated shutoff start time: 7pm-8pm
    • Estimated restoration: 10/16 10pm
    • Estimated number of customers (households/commercial): 1,841

more after the jump...

PROP. 21 (rent control): The LAT's Andrew Khouri writes up Proposition 21 and asks whether additional rent control makes sense in the COVID-19 recession.

PROP. 22 (transportation network companies): For CalMatters, Ben Christopher looks into how the companies backing Prop. 22 are spending all that in-kind dough.

PROP. 23 (dialysis): For CalMatters, Ana B. Ibarra asks whether an issue as complicated as regulating dialysis clinics is too complicated for voters to sort through.

CA50 (East San Diego County):  After being criticized by the left for not answering on a conservative radio show for whom he was voting for President, Ammar Campa-Najjar (D) is amping up the offensive against Darrell Issa (R), the wealthy businessman and former congressman from CA49. Morgan Cook reports for the SDUT:

Former Rep. Darrell Issa is facing criticism from his opponent in the 50th District Congressional race for taking a federal COVID-19 relief loan for one of his businesses, despite Issa’s vast personal fortune and millions of dollars in personal loans he has made to his campaign.

Public records show Issa’s property management company, Greene Properties, Inc., in Vista, received a federal Payroll Protection Program (PPP) loan of between $150,000 and $350,000 on May 3 to save seven jobs. Issa, a Republican who was among the richest members of Congress as recently as 2017 with an estimated fortune of between $256 million and $572 million, is the company’s chief executive officer, according to state business records.

Issa’s wife is listed as an employee of Greene Properties on Issa’s most recent public statement of economic interests.

Campa-Najjar, a Democrat vying for the seat vacated earlier this year by disgraced former Rep. Duncan Hunter, released a campaign advertisement accusing Issa of accepting the loan he didn’t seem to need and then lending the same amount, $150,000, to his campaign about three weeks later on May 25.

Issa told KUSI news on Monday that the ad “is one of those outright lies,” and he denied that any money had been transferred into his campaign coffers from Greene Properties in May, June, July or August. He said the millions of dollars he has put into his campaign have come from his personal accounts, and Campa-Najjar has no evidence to prove otherwise “because it didn’t happen.”

Federal Election Commission (FEC) records show Issa has loaned his campaign about $3.4 million dollars since the start of his campaign in the 50th District.

Issa said in a Twitter post Monday that he had opened his business’ books to a “full audit” to disprove Campa-Najjar’s allegations.

A SurveyUSA poll released September 8 found Campa-Najjar with 45% and Issa with 46%.

CA49 (S. OC/N. SD counties): In a poll released yesterday in the safest 2018 flip by Democrats this year, SurveyUSA found Rep. Mike Levin (D) with 56% and San Juan Capistrano mayor Brian Maryott (R) with 36% among 514 likely voters. In the presidential race, the poll found Joe Biden with 56% and Donald Trump with 39%. In 2016, it was Clinton 50.7%, Trump 43.2%. 

POLICING: Yesterday, Governor Newsom announced the recommendations of his policing advisors on how to reduce confrontations at protests and how the new use-of-force laws are implemented across the state. Alexei Koseff reports for the Chron:

Newsom, who convened the advisers to recommend standards for crowd control and use of force in June after protests over police brutality erupted statewide, encouraged the Legislature to adopt the changes. Lawmakers rejected several bills with similar aims during their most recent session.

“The role of police officers in protests and demonstrations is to keep the peace, and facilitate the ability of protesters to demonstrate peacefully without infringing on their First Amendment rights,” Newsom said in a statement. “Implementation of these recommendations will help ensure our law enforcement agencies are better equipped to respond safely to protests and demonstrations and reinforce the values of community partnership, de-escalation, and restraint.”

Ron Davis, a former East Palo Alto police chief and director of the federal Office of Community Oriented Policing Services under former President Barack Obama, and Lateefah Simon, a racial justice activist from Oakland who serves on the BART Board of Directors, wrote the recommendations after consulting this summer with law enforcement and local government officials and representatives of community groups. They are expected to recommend separate guidelines for police use of force in the coming weeks.

FLAVORED TOBACCO: In the Chron, Phil Matier writes up the campaign by tobacco companies to collect signatures for a referendum of SB 793 (Hill) in a tough environment and approaching deadline.

A coalition of big tobacco companies and small retailers is paying professional signature gatherers upward of $10 a name in an attempt to put the brakes on the statewide law barring brick-and-mortar stores from selling menthol cigarettes and other flavored tobacco products.

With the Nov. 30 deadline approaching for submitting signatures to qualify the measure for the 2022 ballot, the high-dollar effort has become an interesting blend of California politics and potentially huge business profits, with a dash of coronavirus shutdown tossed in for good measure.

At issue: SB793, authored by state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, and signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom in August. Stores that break the ban on selling flavored tobacco and e-cigarettes would face a $250 fine per violation.

Tobacco interests wasted no time filing the paperwork to put the law before voters in a referendum. They need 623,212 validated signatures to make the ballot.

LATINO LEGISLATIVE CAUCUS: The caucus yesterday announced its leadership for the new session, with Senator Maria Elena Durazo (D-Los Angeles) serving as chair and Assembly member Robert Rivas (D-Hollister) serving as vice-chair.

@LorenaSGonzalez tweeted:

I just completed my 2 year term as Chair of the Latino Caucus. Excited to hand over the reins to @MariaEDurazo who will be a fantastic chair & @AsmRobertRivas
who will likewise serve as an incredible Vice-Chair. Both were elected unanimously this morning.

Very proud of the work we did over the past 2 years, passing 24 bills that were signed into law. These bills expanded EITC and medi-cal to undocumented Californians, protected latino workers and increased health and voting opportunities.

We also raised a record half a million dollars for scholarships — giving out 102 $5,000 awards.

Looking forward to heading up our new initiative to tackle Latina Inequities.

@AsmRobertRivas tweeted:

Thank you for your fierce & strong leadership over the past two years, Asm. Gonzalez!

Under your tenure as Chair, the Caucus has amplified its voice in advocating for the Latino community—tackling issues from economic equity to education to environmental justice.

Thank YOU!

cakeday and classifieds after the jump...

Probolsky Research

CAKEDAY: Happy birthday to Aref Aziz, Senator Mike Morrell, and Sal Russo!

Classifieds

Add your classified now both in The Nooner and online for $50/week or $150/month by emailing scottlay@gmail.com, with a headline, a summary of up to 200 words, and what you'd like the end date to be. You can attach a PDF or provide a link for a bigger job description/info to apply. [Other advertising options]


The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific

In addition to a well-respected JD, the McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, offers the Master of Public Administration (MPA) and the Master of Public Policy (MPP) degrees. Both full-time students and those earning a professional degree while working succeed in the program. Our focus on the interconnections of law, policy, management, and leadership provides unique competencies for your success. Students gain a foundation in statutory interpretation and skills in public policy making and implementation. Learn at a beautiful campus three miles from the State Capitol:
go.mcgeorge.edu/publicpolicy

California School Boards Association - Public Affairs & Community Engagement Representatives

Serve as CSBA’s liaison to local schools and county boards of education, key decision makers, and the community-at-large. Execute grassroots strategies designed to build relationships with, train, and mobilize local school board members and communities to advance CSBA’s legislative and statewide ballot measure advocacy priorities. Coordinates and executes fundraising events. Remote positions based in the following locations: Southeast L.A. and North L.A./Ventura. Salary based on experience. Please apply at: https://www.csba.org/About/Careers

California School Boards Association - Legislative Director

CSBA is seeking a Legislative Director to lead our Governmental Relations team to shape legislative and political strategy for CSBA’s statewide agenda. You will act as a liaison between legislative, educational, and public communities. If you are interested in leading a team of legislative advocates to influence opinion in favor of public education, please apply through our website. Position is located in West Sacramento. Learn more and apply here: https://www.csba.org/About/Careers

Offices available for sublease: Meridian Plaza

Between 1-3 offices are available for sublease in the Meridian Plaza office building, 1415 L Street, two blocks from the Capitol. The offices are approximately 150 SF each. Internet, gym, partially furnished (desk, chair, bookcases) are included. 24/7/365 key card access; floor-ceiling windows facing Sierras; professional offices. One year lease preferred. $1,500 per office. Contact Jane at admin@stoneadvocacy.com or (415) 577-9734 with questions.

Photos: 1 | 2 | 3

Political Data Inc.
For 30 Years PDI has been California’s premier data vendor. Now, you can get live online trainings on the newest PDI software every week: