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CCST Science and Technology Week

 

Classifieds below:

  • Education: Pepperdine Masters of Public Policy (GRE waived for legislative staffers)
  • Education: UOP/McGeorge School of Law: MPP/MPA (full-time or part-time, 3 miles from the Capitol)
  • Job: SAC LGBT COMMUNITY CENTER - Resident house manager (Sacramento)
  • Job: SEIU-UHW – Regional Political Organizer (Los Angeles)
  • Job: SEIU-UHW -- Assistant Director, Government Relations (Sacramento)
  • Job: SEIU-UHW -- Political Capacity Organizer (Los Angeles)
  • CA School Boards Association – Public Affairs and Community Engagement Representatives (Bay Area, LA North East, Orange, San Bernardino, San Joaquin North)
  • Traning: PDI (Political Data Inc.): weekly online trainings of various skill levels 

The Weekend Nooners: I know that after last week's work week, some of you let The Nooner fall down in your email inbox, and I don't blame you. But, we had some good items over the weekend (in the honest opinion of me and the hamsters).

  • Saturday: Are California's voters really following harassment in the Legislature? Governor Jerry's Brown's water tunnels, DACA and the wall, and a "state of the race" discussion of those who want to be governor.
  • Sunday: I discuss why I moved Congressman Duncan Hunter's CA50 from "Likely Republican" to "Toss-up." Some of his colleagues are scrambling to get him out amidst allegations of women, booze, and, oh yeah, the FBI investigation into his campaign expenditures. More on this below the jump.

Happy Monday folks! I enjoyed speaking yesterday with the 2018 fellows class of the Sacramento chapter of the New Leaders Council. What an impressive group of young leaders! With all the UGH factor we've had around the Capitol the last six months, I have great hope. 

 

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Upward Mobility at Cal State LA

 

CA50 (East San Diego County): Yesteday, in the discussion of Duncan Hunter's (R) congressional seat, I mentioned "retiring" Darrell Issa (R). I didn't mention State Senator Joel Anderson (R), and I probably should have. He lives in the district in Alpine (as does Hunter). He's served in the Assembly or State Senate in the area since 2006, and was planning to run to return for a final term in the Assembly. That changed in January after Issa's retirement in CA49 (Oceanside), which led from Diane Harkey (R) to run for CA48 rather than re-election for Board of Equalization.

Issa ended the year with $1,052,398 in his congressional committee account and is also the wealthiest member of the House with an estimated $330 million. People familiar know that he doesn't want to give up that House lapel pin. He'd prefer the Senate one, but that isn't going to happen in California. Money won't be a problem for him in a race, but it would come down to carpet-bagging and perceived acerbic demeanor as liabilities.

Anderson ended 2017 with $136,623 in his 2018 Assembly account, all of which can be transferred to his Board of Equalization race. Those funds can't be transferred to a congressional committee. They would have to be returned to the donor along with an ask for contributions for the federal committee. Of course, corporate contributions would be prohibited, and contributions would be limited at $2,700 per election (primary/general - state is $4,400). That's why it is rarely done and really isn't worth it to go through the process. I'm sure Kevin de León has thoughts on this.

If Hunter bows out as some of his colleagues in the House want, the filing deadline would be March 14--30 days from now. That's the go or no go date, and it would be awfully late to start anew with no federal cash. Anderson, a businessman, can't compete with Issa in personal funds.

Given this, I can't imagine Anderson would switch to a face-off with Issa. The National Republican Congressional Committee likely would prefer to see a Hunter exit and an Issa move, as the NRCC is already stretched very thin across the country, particularly with the number of self-funding by Democrats in competitive races. 

GOV: On a chilly gloomy day, gubernatorial candidate Assemblyman Travis Allen rallied his troops on the Capitol steps yesterday, reports Liam Dillon in the Times.

He took aim at Gavin Newsom, the Lieutenant Governor and former San Francisco mayor:

“Do you want California to look like San Francisco with mounds of human waste?” Allen said to the crowd. “Do you want California to look like San Francisco and legalize heroin injection centers in your neighborhoods?”

He also blasted Villaraigosa, saying downtown L.A. looks like a “Third World country.”

Actually, downtown LA is world's apart in a good way from what it was when I was growing up. He also went after the leading Republican in the race, with an additional jab at the leading Democrat.

Allen reminded the crowd, which was filled with Trump supporters, that Cox declined to vote for Trump in the 2016 election, and instead voted for Libertarian Gary Johnson, the former governor of New Mexico.

“This guy Cox voted for a guy who believes in open borders, legalized drugs and legalized prostitution,” Allen said. “I don’t know about you, but that sounds like Gavin Newsom to me.”

MORE GUB: For the LAT, Seema Mehta and Phil Willon write that the #METOO issue is now a major issue in the gubernatorial campaign as it raises questions of sex and relationships and whether they will be an issue in the campaign.

When Gavin Newsom and Antonio Villaraigosa entered the governor's race, it was widely assumed that their past extramarital affairs were behind them. The details about their relationships when they served as mayors of San Francisco and Los Angeles, respectively, had been aired more than a decade ago, both men had settled down and established families and voters seemed uninterested in politicians' peccadilloes.

Then, the #MeToo movement happened. Multiple detailed accounts of sexual misconduct emerged in Hollywood, the media and statehouses across the nation.

Note: Newsom engaged an affair with his campaign manager's wife, who was Newsom's appointments secretary, after has was separated and undergoing a divorce. Villaraigosa was still with his then-wife when he had a local news anchor. He has since remarried someone else. Semantics to some; a big deal to others.

Legislative records released just over a week ago also revealed that Republican gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen, an assemblyman from Huntington Beach, was among the state lawmakers accused of sexual harassment in recent years. Allen called the allegation, which included making a woman uncomfortable by being "unnecessarily close," totally unfounded. But he's still come under attack by rivals in the race.

It's a different conversation from the fall, when some assumed that the affairs would be a footnote in the campaign. And it comes as Americans are rethinking past scandals, including President Clinton's affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. 

After the jump, I wade into water politics, perhaps an issue almost equally difficult.

 

Probolsky Research

 

FROM THE DESK OF THE DEAN: In the Times, George Skelton writes that the state is sitting on approved bond funds for water storage that it isn't spending despite plentiful requests, even amidst a dry winter.

A key selling point [in the 2014 general obligation bond placed on the ballot by the Legislature] was $2.7 billion set aside for additional water storage. Most voters probably envisioned new dams, although projects to replenish groundwater basins also were eligible for the money.

Skelton's column gets into the details and is certainly worth a read. Basically the bond funds can only pay for 50% of the cost of a project, leaving local water districts scrambling to figure out how to come up with the rest amidst $5.8 billion in requests before the California Water Commission. Add in the politics of a big project like the proposed Sites Reservoir in Colusa County, and policy-makers find themselves, well underwater. Proponents of Sites alone want $1.7 billion (63%) of the bond funds. 

Advocates for Sites cite the state's major water storage needs, even with much better water conservation that has developed through the droughts. Of course, many really are looking at the economic benefit during the construction (short-term). More importantly, they are motivatied by the the long-term effects of increased recreational and adjacent land development opportunities (including lake view housing) as we see with other reservoirs.

Opponents generally include environmental groups and sports fishermen, who fear its impact on wildlife and fish. The location of the proposed reservoir  is currently used for cattle grazing. This includes many groups opposing Governor Brown's tunnel(s) California WaterFix, who fear that the reduction in Sacramento River flow from the dam will increase the salinity of the Delta, particularly if the tunnel is built, hurting farmers and threatened fish species.

Big infrastructure projects, particularly in underdeveloped parts of the state, are not just about meeting a documented state need, but also about competing economic needs.

Instead, they are often about local economic development tools. We all knew we needed more college seats anticipating demographic peak of "Tidal Wave II" (which has now passed), and more access to university-level education in the Central Valley. For those that were around the Legislature during the fight to approve UC Merced, we recall that many of the strongest advocates were pushed by beneficiaries of the private development (and of course the construction) around the campus and the city's leaders hoping to boost the city's economy.

While somewhat bound by the advocacy of the Board of Regents and thus UC Office of the President, campus leaders of existing campuses were not excited about adding the tenth campus, fearing a competition for funds and, eventually after Tidal Wave II, students. And, that's where we lie today.

Today, only 28.8% of UC Merced undergraduate students are from the San Joaquin Valley, although it is the only UC campus with a majority Latino undergraduates (53.3%). And in-state demand has generally subsided demographically statewide, with the most competitive UC campuses taking more out-of-state and international students and redirecting in-state applicants to campuses with lesser demands.

UC Merced is overwhelmingly serving Californians, and for many it was a referral when their first choice wasn't available. That has nothing to do with the quality of academics, but rather geographic proximity to large college-going populations and the still developing comprehensive university experience, such as athletics. (Merced currently has M/W basketball, soccer, volleyball, and cross-country, competing in the Division II Cal Pac conference of the NAIA.) It takes a long time to fully build out a national university expected of UC campuses by would-be students.

Meanwhile, UC Merced is 7 miles out of town so while the campus's professors and staff may be regularly shopping and dining, large numbers of students choose on-campus options or trips home. In contrast, the city of Davis is walking distance for on-campus students and even then, there is major competition between the university and the town as the campus adds major student housing and amenities to its vast land to the west, away from the town.

Even with shuttle buses, I am told that many town businesses have felt the magnitude and timeline of the economic impact of the new university was oversold.

A Sites reservoir would pull water from the Sacramento River and store it 31 miles away. By doing so, "upstream" water agencies would be able to sell existing water rights to "downstream" agencies in the Central Valley and Southern California. The agencies around the proposed dam aren't facing a shortage of water, but have historical water rights to the Sacramento River and are happy to sell or lease some of them. And, further south before the controversial State Water Project/Delta issues are cities like Davis and Woodland.

The cities of Davis and Woodland, historically did not have water rights to the Sacramento River, relying instead on well water. That changed by the purchase of rights from the Conaway Preservation group, a group of investors that had bought the "Conaway Ranch" in bankruptcy court That property, which is the stretch of Interstate 80 between West Sacramento and Davis known as the "Causeway" that is used as an overflow basin for the river in wet years included significant water rights.

Davis is on the Sites Authority JPA Board, which is interesting, as the city's voters are generally very liberal and allies of the environmental groups opposing the project (and dams generally except for the Monticello Dam on Lake Berryessa, which keeps water from flowing from the west). But the two cities' and UC Davis's growth have been threatened by the reliance on well water and surface water quality is considered better.

Interesting fact--the managing partner of the Conaway Preservation Group (CPG) that owns the land, which Davis and Woodland bought surface water rights from, is Angelo Tsakopolous and the president is Kyriakos Tsakapolous--the father and son of lieutenant governor Eleni Tsakapolous, who is past president of AKT Development, in which Kyriakos now serves. It really has no direct tie to Sites, but just one of those connections worth mentioning, as there are more water rights to be sold by CPG, particularly to Southern California.

Don't take anything I've written as gospel and I am sure I'll be hearing from the multiple perspectives of the passionate debate. I've spent my time researching the topics, but water and land rights, bankruptcy courts, and changes in land rights are out of my bailiwick. I'm sure I'll be writing more on the topic.

 

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Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute

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#CAKEDAY: Happy birthday to Sean South and John Wildermuth!

 


 

 

CLASSIFIEDS

Add your classified of up to 100 words by emailing scott@scottlay.com for $40/week.
 
  • SEIU-UHW – Regional Political Organizer (Los Angeles)
    This position is responsible for a broad range of program objectives to build and strengthen our infrastructure and engage our members to be a powerful force at their worksites, in the legislative process, in the community and at the ballot box. Proven track record is a must. Competitive salary and excellent benefits. For more information on the position and to apply please visit our candidate portal at http://www.aroundthecapitol.com/r.html?s=n&l=http://seiuunitedhealthcareworkers.appone.com/.

  • See Your Future Differently from Here with a Master of Public Policy degree from the Pepperdine School of Public Policy. Overlooking panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean from Malibu, our unique policy graduate program melds quantitative analysis with political philosophy, applied history, constitutional law, and strategy to prepare policy leaders for an impactful and successful career in the private sector, non-profit arena, and government service. Standardized test admission requirement is waived for legislative staffers. Learn more at publicpolicy.pepperdine.edu/masters-6/.

  • The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, in Sacramento offers the Master of Public Administration (MPA) and the Master of Public Policy (MPP) degrees to both full-time students and those earning a professional degree while working. Just three miles from the Capitol, our focus on the interconnections of law, policy, management, and leadership provides unique competencies for your success. Students gain a foundation knowledge of statutory interpretation and regulatory processes critical to modern governance. Learn more at go.mcgeorge.edu/publicpolicy and sign-up for an information session or webinar, or contact us at publicpolicy@pacific.edu.
  • SAC LGBT COMMUNITY CENTER - Resident house manager (Sacramento)
    The Resident House Manager is responsible for all aspects of resident supervision in the transitional living program for LGBTQ youth (18- 24) victims of crime. This includes supervising resident activities, maintaining a safe and supportive atmosphere, ensuring residents adhere to programs rules, and complete their chores. The Resident House Manager lives on site at the house with residents and will be provided with a private room. This position reports to the Youth Programs Manager and works in partnership with other programming staff and stakeholders as well as directly with community members of diverse backgrounds. This position is a live-in position. The working hours will be 6 days a week generally from 6 to 10 p.m with limited on-call status. This is a part-time, non-exempt position.
    [More info]
  • SEIU-UHW -- Assistant Director, Government Relations (Sacramento)
    This position will lead our governmental advocacy program with members of the California Legislature, members of Congress and otheelected officials to persuade them to support or oppose legislation or regulation on behalf of SEIU-UHW. The Director would be responsible for overseeing all aspects of major projects and programs within the department, directing the work of multiple staff, contractors and member leaders in support of objectives. This position reports to the Political Director and works with senior staff in the overall development and implementation of the department's strategic organizational plan. Competitive salary and excellent benefits.  For more information on the position and to apply please visit our candidate portal at seiuunitedhealthcareworkers.appone.com.

  • SEIU-UHW -- Political Capacity Organizer (Los Angeles)
    This position is responsible for a range of program objectives to build and strengthen our infrastructure and engage our members to be a powerful force at their worksites, in the legislative process, in the community and at the ballot box.  Proven track record is a must.  Competitive salary and excellent benefits.  For more information on the position and to apply please visit our candidate portal at seiuunitedhealthcareworkers.appone.com.
  • CA School Boards Association – Public Affairs and Community Engagement Representative (Bay Area)
    This position serves as CSBA’s liaison to local school and county boards of education, key decision-makers and the community-at-large, and is responsible for implementing CSBA’s grassroots program, establishing relationships, and facilitating local and regional outreach and activation efforts. Communicates about issues in education that require familiarity with educational laws, regulations and trends. Executes grassroots strategies designed to build relationships with, train, support and mobilize local school board members and communities to advance CSBA’s legislative and statewide ballot measure advocacy priorities. Coordinates and executes fundraising events. BOE. Details:

    www.csba.org/About/Careers/PublicAffairsCommunityEngagementRepresentative_BayArea.aspx
  • CA School Boards Association – Public Affairs and Community Engagement Representative (LA-North East) This position serves as CSBA’s liaison to local school and county boards of education, key decision-makers and the community-at-large, and is responsible for implementing CSBA’s grassroots program, establishing relationships, and facilitating local and regional outreach and activation efforts. Communicates about issues in education that require familiarity with educational laws, regulations and trends. Executes grassroots strategies designed to build relationships with, train, support and mobilize local school board members and communities to advance CSBA’s legislative and statewide ballot measure advocacy priorities. Coordinates and executes fundraising events. BOE. Details:

    www.csba.org/About/Careers/PublicAffairsCommunityEngagementRepresentative_LANorthEast.aspx
  • CA School Boards Association – Public Affairs and Community Engagement Representative (Orange) This position serves as CSBA’s liaison to local school and county boards of education, key decision-makers and the community-at-large, and is responsible for implementing CSBA’s grassroots program, establishing relationships, and facilitating local and regional outreach and activation efforts. Communicates about issues in education that require familiarity with educational laws, regulations and trends. Executes grassroots strategies designed to build relationships with, train, support and mobilize local school board members and communities to advance CSBA’s legislative and statewide ballot measure advocacy priorities. Coordinates and executes fundraising events. BOE.

    Details:www.csba.org/About/Careers/PublicAffairsCommunityEngagementRepresentative_Orange.aspx 
  • CA School Boards Association – Public Affairs and Community Engagement Representative (San Bernardino) This position serves as CSBA’s liaison to local school and county boards of education, key decision-makers and the community-at-large, and is responsible for implementing CSBA’s grassroots program, establishing relationships, and facilitating local and regional outreach and activation efforts. Communicates about issues in education that require familiarity with educational laws, regulations and trends. Executes grassroots strategies designed to build relationships with, train, support and mobilize local school board members and communities to advance CSBA’s legislative and statewide ballot measure advocacy priorities. Coordinates and executes fundraising events. BOE. Details:

    www.csba.org/About/Careers/PublicAffairsCommunityEngagementRepresentative_SanBernardino.aspx
  • CA School Boards Association – Public Affairs and Community Engagement Representative (San Joaquin North) This position serves as CSBA’s liaison to local school and county boards of education, key decision-makers and the community-at-large, and is responsible for implementing CSBA’s grassroots program, establishing relationships, and facilitating local and regional outreach and activation efforts. Communicates about issues in education that require familiarity with educational laws, regulations and trends. Executes grassroots strategies designed to build relationships with, train, support and mobilize local school board members and communities to advance CSBA’s legislative and statewide ballot measure advocacy priorities. Coordinates and executes fundraising events. BOE. Details:

    https://www.csba.org/About/Careers/PublicAffairsCommunityEngagementRepresentative_SanJoaquinNorth.aspx

 


 

 

TOP HEADLINES ON AROUNDTHECAPITOL.COM AS OF 12:00PM
Californians Voted To Spend Billions On More Water Storage. But State Government Keeps Sitting On The Cash
George Skelton @
latimes.com
Voters approved $2.7 bil in bonds for water storage, including dams, 4 years ago and the state water commission so far is rejecting all applications for the money. Bond backers crying foul.

Republicans Moving Forward With Trump's Immigration Framework - Politico

President Trump's immigration framework will likely get a vote during during the Senate's wide-ranging immigration debate this month, though it probably won't become law without major alterations that could bring Democratic support.

Homeless Housing Would Grow Under California Proposal | The Sacramento Bee
Angela Hart @
sacbee.com
The go-to source for news on California policy and politics

How Will The #metoo Movement Shape California's Race For Governor? Voters Are Starting To Find Out
Seema Mehta, Phil Willon @
latimes.com
When Gavin Newsom and Antonio Villaraigosa entered the governor's race, it was assumed that their past extramarital affairs were behind them. Then, the #MeToo movement happened.

Sacramento Launches Vision Zero Plan To Cut Injury And Fatality Crashes On City Streets | The Sacramento Bee
Tony Bizjak @
sacbee.com
Tony Bizjak writes about traffic and travel in the Sacramento region

The Road To Building A Border Wall Will Be Long And Difficult, And Go Through The Courts
Jaclyn Cosgrove @
latimes.com
President Trump's long-promised border wall faces many challenges, legal as well as political.

Leonard Padilla, Sacramento Bail Bonds Icon, Declining In Denver | The Sacramento Bee
that measure, few Sacramentans have lived a life more memorable than Padilla. And there has to be some validation in that. @
sacbee.com
Connecting the dots on issues, people and news in the Sacramento region

Pence Pac Shaping Republican Governor Races, With An Eye On 2020 - Politico

Vice President Mike Pence has so far not supported any candidates who regularly speak out against President Donald Trump, no matter how endangered they are. The aim is to actively support those who actively support the president. | Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sacramento Regional Transit Light Rail Trains Are Now Art Pieces | The Sacramento Bee
Tony Bizjak @
sacbee.com
By Tony Bizjak

New York Attorney General Sues Weinstein Co. For Civil Rights 'violations,' Throwing Sale Into Question
Ryan Faughnder @
latimes.com
New York Atty. Gen. Eric Schneiderman on Sunday sued the Weinstein Co. and its co-founders, Harvey Weinstein and Bob Weinstein, for "egregious violations of New York's civil rights, human rights and business laws," the attorney general's office said in a statement.

180,000 Evacuate Because Of Emergency Spillway Danger
chicoer.com
Today's high

Trump Budget Anticipates Mueller Investigation Will Stretch Into Fiscal Year 2019 - Politico

The White House budget projects that special counsel Robert Mueller's team will keep spending at its current rate of about $10 million per year in the next fiscal year. | Alex Wong/Getty Images

In Unaccustomed Turn, White House Infrastructure Plan Praises California Funding Measure
Laura King @
latimes.com
California and the Trump administration differ on many things, but White House infrastructure plan singles out L.A. County's Measure M for praise.

Trump Infrastructure Plan Could Sell Off Reagan, Dulles Airports - Politico

The Trump administration's infrastructure plan released Monday proposes that the federal government consider selling off Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport.

After Las Vegas Massacre, Congress Has Failed To Act On 'bump Stocks.' But States And Cities Are Taking The Lead
Kurtis Lee @
latimes.com
In the immediate aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, there was a fevered pitch to ban bump stocks. So far, Congress has yet to act, but local governments are passing laws.

Today In Trumpworld — Feb. 12 - Politico

11 a.m.: President Donald Trump will meet with state and local officials at the White House to discuss his infrastructure initiative.

Santa Barbara Authorities On Edge With Light Rain Expected Across Southern California
Javier Panzar @
latimes.com
Only about half an inch of rain is expected to fall between Monday and Wednesday, nothing like the heavy rainfall that triggered the massive and deadly debris flows in Montecito last month, according to the National Weather Service.