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THE NOONER for January 24, 2016

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Learn about the McGeorge Master of Science in Law (MSL) degree for professionals who seek the benefits of advanced training in legal reasoning, at an information session: Jan. 26, 6 p.m. (3200 Fifth Ave.) or Feb. 16, 5:15 p.m. (State Capitol).


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As I predicted, the House of Representatives has shut down for the week because of The Big Dig, which means that Congress will get 100% of a normal week's worth done. Sort of like Rick Santorum's poll numbers. They have increased 100% from 0% to 0%.

Meanwhile at this hour (except for the Early Bird subscribers), the large Nooner staff is cheering on the Broncos. Anyway, with gameday starting shortly, I'll be quick!

AGUA?: As snowpack deepens, drought concern lingers [Aaron Orlowski @ OCR] - "Halfway through the winter, more water is stored in California’s snowpack than is usual for this time of year – signaling that maybe, just maybe, this could be the year the drought eases."

MIXED MESSAGES: Economic health a mixed bag [Dan Walters @ SacBee] - "Since 2007, for instance, the San Francisco Bay Area, with 20 percent of the state’s population, has generated well over half of the state’s employment growth. Conversely, Los Angeles County, with a 25 percent of the population, has produced less than 10 percent of the new jobs. There obviously is an ethnic component to that contrast. The Bay Area is largely white and Asian, while Los Angeles is mostly Latino, a group with overall low educational and income levels."

THE GAS CHAMBER: Fast-acting methane from Aliso Canyon leak is boosting global warming [Tony Barbosa @ LAT] - "In three months, one failed well at Southern California Gas Co.'s Aliso Canyon storage field has spewed more greenhouse gases than any other facility in California. At its height, the leak more than doubled the methane emissions of the entire Los Angeles Basin and surpassed what is released by all industrial activity in the state."

HOLY S***: "So far, the leak has generated as much greenhouse gases as driving a car than 5 billion miles, or around the earth 200,866 times."

My sister lives 18 miles from the site of the leak and can smell it. This is one of the largest natural gas "reservoirs" in the U.S., where gas is pumped down into underground vacuums, often where oil had been previously pumped out. 

It's one of those things necessitated by our use of gas ranges, gas-fired heat, barbecues, and Chinese food. But, as shown over the last month, there's also a huge risk. Sacramento is primarily served by an underground storage facility in Lodi. Just not something we think about until a disaster happens.

Meanwhile, SoCalGas has been ordered to shut down the well permanently.

#CAKEDAY: Happy birthday to Brian Johsz, director at the Chino Valley Fire District!

 

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Disney Institute in Merced


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  • California Partnership to End Domestic Violence seeks experienced Prevention & Education Policy Specialist. College degree required. Responsible for leading and implementing the Partnership’s Adolescent Dating Abuse Policy Project and related strategies. Please send resume and cover letter to jobs@cpedv.org.

  • Thinking about Graduate School?  Sacramento State’s master’s degree in Public Policy and Administration is the region’s most affordable program, offering a rigorous education in both public policy and administration, nested in the political context. More than 400 alumni work in California state and local government as well as private and non-profit organizations. Applications are due March 1, 2016.www.csus.edu/ppa     ppa-01@csus.edu 

  • TBW Media/TBWB Strategies is interviewing experienced campaign managers and campaign staffers at all levels for potential campaign positions with our client campaigns this year throughout California. If interested please send a cover letter, resume, salary history, writing sample and 3 references to Barry Barnes (bbarnes@tbwb.com). No phone calls please.
  • Capital Fellows Program - There are only three weeks left to apply for the Capital Fellows program. The deadline is February 6, and I strongly encourage you to consider it if you are looking at work in the Capitol or as a bridge between undergrad and grad school, as some of the best legislative staff (and even legislators) started as fellows. Get more info here.
  • Vice President, Public Affairs.  Fiona Hutton & Associates, one of California’s largest independent public affairs agencies, is seeking a Vice President to join the firm’s growing Los Angeles office. FHA is an established leader in managing high-profile and controversial issues for a diverse client base. We’re looking for the best of the best. The candidate that thrives in a fast-paced, entrepreneurial environment, working on high stakes situations, and demonstrates a commitment to excellence. The Vice President is responsible for establishing client strategy, overseeing implementation, managing a team and helping grow the business. 

    Please see link for additional details and how to apply: fionahuttonassoc.com/pdf/FHA_VP_Announcement_11316.pdf

  • Fiona Hutton & Associates, one of California’s largest independent public affairs agencies, is seeking an Account Supervisor to join the firm’s growing Los Angeles office. FHA is an established leader in managing high-profile and controversial issues for a diverse client base. We’re looking for the best of the best. The candidate that thrives in a fast-paced, entrepreneurial environment, working on high stakes situations, and demonstrates a commitment to excellence. The Account Supervisor is responsible for tactical implementation of client programs and plans, oversight of communications materials, ensuring quality control and managing a team.

    Please see link for additional details and how to apply: fionahuttonassoc.com/pdf/FHA_Accnt_Supervisor_Announcement_11316.pdf

  • Subscribe to the Capitol Morning Report and closely follow who’s doing what each day in California government and politics. We list news conferences, legislative hearings, state board meetings and other events. Plus we add in community news and announcements from political campaigns. More info at www.capitolmr.com

  • Planned Parenthood Affiliates of CA seeks two experienced Senior Campaign Organizers to work with the seven California Planned Parenthood affiliates through November 2016. Salary (DOE) and reimbursement of healthcare up to a cap. Details here.
  • THERE'S MUCH MORE TO EFFECTIVE LOBBYING THAN LEGISLATIVE ADVOCACY. Get the total picture of lobbying in California with Capitol veteran Ray LeBov's introductory Lobbying 101 and advanced Lobbying 201 seminars January 28-29. $250 each. Lobbying 101 covers the Legislative process and Legislative advocacy; Lobbying 201 explores time-tested principles / best practices in the equally critical areas of Budget, Regulatory Agency and Executive Branch advocacy plus Media Relations. Essential for lobbying firm principals / staff, organizations / agencies that employ lobbyists, newcomers to the profession. Information / registration:  www.capitolseminars.net or 916 442 5009.
  • SEIU United Healthcare Workers-West Regional Political Organizers (Los Angeles and Bay Area). 85,000 member California healthcare union seeks strategic, progressive, motivated political organizers, 3-5 yrs political/union experience. Competitive salary and benefits package. Resume, letter, 3 references: recruiter@seiu-uhw.org

  • Planned Parenthood Affiliates of CA seeks two experienced Senior Campaign Organizers to work with the seven California Planned Parenthood affiliates  on campus  and electoral organizing through the November 2016. Three to five years and two election cycles experience as full time campaign staff required. Prior management experience preferred. Excellent salary (DOE) and cellphone/laptop stipend and reimbursement of healthcare up to a cap. Positions located in the south and north. Details here.


 

 

TOP HEADLINES ON AROUNDTHECAPITOL.COM AS OF 12:00PM
Loretta Sanchez Runs Against Kamala Harris And Herself | The Sacramento Bee
Dan Morain @
sacbee.com
Loretta Sanchez is as unvarshished as Kamala Harris is smooth

California Marijuana Growers Face New Crop Of Local Bans | 89.3 Kpcc
Southern California Public Radio @
scpr.org
A bud grows on a marijuana plant at Oaksterdam University July 22, 2009 in Oakland, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Economic Health A Mixed Bag | The Sacramento Bee
Dan Walters @
sacbee.com
California ended 2015 with employment gain

Retiring California Lawmakers Talk About What's Left To Do And What's Next
latimes.com
With less than a year until their replacements are sworn in, California Sen. Barbara Boxer and Reps. Sam Farr and Lois Capps are checking off their to-do lists, trying to wrap up decades of work in Washington.

8 days till Iowa: The latest photos from the campaign trail
politico.com
With the Iowa caucuses just a flip of a calendar page away, POLITICO takes you on the campaign trail Saturday, Jan. 23, as presidential candidates scramble for last-minute support.

Jennifer Pahlka helps improve how government works
sfgate.com
From her office in an old leather factory South of Market, Jennifer Pahlka is working to change the way government uses technology, one city at a time. Pahlka is founder and executive director of the nonprofit Code for America, which brings in mid-career tech workers willing to work for a year in cities looking for outside help. [...] it helped create an application to make it easier for city workers to deal with a growing flood of public records requests, but also posted the results of those searches online for everyone to see. Evan Marwell, last year’s award winner and a member of this year’s nominating committee, cited her work’s success in getting young people engaged in technology. Marwell’s nonprofit group, Education SuperHighway, is focused on narrowing the digital divide by helping schools across the nation get wired for high-speed Internet. Like many others, Palhka moved into the tech world and spent years arranging and organizing conferences, first for game developers and later for events pushing the growing idea of Web 2.0, which argued that the regular back-and-forth interaction — and content sharing — between users and their customers (think YouTube, Twitter, Google and many others) was the digital future. “If people are going to give money for government programs to help people, they should want programs that really help those people, as well as respect them and use the money efficiently,” she said. When a friend talked about his experience with Teach for America, which asks young college grads to spend two years teaching in urban or rural schools, Pahlka had her inspiration. Cities and states have to be convinced that waiting to make something the absolute best doesn’t always make sense in the fast-moving world of technology, Pahlka said. In 2013, Pahlka spent a year as deputy chief technology officer in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, advocating for more customer-focused, “agile technology” that would respond faster to user complaints and concerns. The nonprofit’s budget, which was about $30,000 for its first six months, has grown to about $11 million a year, thanks to support from individuals, foundations and companies like Microsoft, Adobe, Google and others from the tech sector. The honor salutes leaders who strive to make the world a better place and drive social and economic change by employing new, innovative business models and practices. The eight finalists were nominated by a distinguished committee that included Evan Marwell, CEO and co-founder of the nonprofit group Education SuperHighway; Pam Baer, founder and CEO of For Goodness Sake, a nonprofit foundation that created an e-commerce site to connect consumers with curated brands and nonprofits; Ron Conway, an angel investor and philanthropist; Ben Fong-Torres, a noted rock journalist, author and broadcaster; Pamela Joyner, founder of the strategic marketing consulting company Avid Partners LLC; Zhan Li, dean of St. Mary's School of Economics and Business Administration; and John Diaz, The Chronicle’s editorial page editor.

Two Maps That Illustrate California's Growing Opioid Epidemic | The Sacramento Bee
sacbee.com
As prescription opioids and illegal heroin rise further in popularity, the number of drug overdoses in the state hit a new high in 2014, according to new estimates from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

First Draft: Hillary Clinton Says Senator Charles Grassley Wants â
rss.nytimes.com
s senior Republican senator, Charles E. Grassley, of trying to undermine her presidential candidacy by leaking negative information about her tenure as secretary of state.

Sacramento School To Get 2.5-acre Farm, Food Literacy Classes | The Sacramento Bee
Jessica Hice @
sacbee.com
Farm will serve students at Leataata Floyd Elementary School

San Diego Charter Schools Stir Conflicts | Sandiegouniontribune.com
sandiegouniontribune.com
Steve Van Zant in 2008 when he was a principal in Carlsbad.

Development Rights No Cure-all For Raiders Stadium Shortfall
Matthew Artz @
mercurynews.com
But real estate professionals doubt whether that strategy can close the estimated $300 million funding gap for a stadium the Raiders say will cost $900 million, leaving the team's long-term fate further in question after the NFL rejected its bid to move to Los Angeles. Any developer would face pressure to build less profitable affordable housing and to use union construction workers while operating in a section of town that has seen the economic boom mostly pass it by.

As Snowpack Deepens, Drought Concern Lingers - The Orange County Register
AARON ORLOWSKI @
ocregister.com
Halfway through the winter, more water is stored in California’s snowpack than is usual for this time of year – signaling that maybe, just maybe, this could be the year the drought eases.

Michael Bloomberg Is Mulling An Independent White House Bid
latimes.com
More from Trail Guide Jan. 22 Chris Christie heads back to New Jersey as blizzard approaches Jan. 21 Donald Trump and Ted Cruz try to debunk each other's outsider image Jan. 20 Sarah Palin, on the trail with Donald Trump, talks of son's domestic violence arrest Jan. 19 Sarah Palin endorses Donald...

Mario Woodsâ
sfgate.com
The final chapter of Mario Woods’ life began when he slashed a stranger for no apparent reason and ended with him staring at the barrel of a San Francisco police officer’s gun and saying, “You better squeeze that ... and kill me.” Within minutes of when he first defied police efforts to arrest him, Woods, 26, lay dead on a Bayview district sidewalk, shot by as many as 15 rounds fired by five officers. The incident was witnessed by middle school children passing on a Muni bus — including two youngsters who filmed the shooting on their cell phones. Police, the district attorney and Office of Citizen Complaints are investigating the shooting, with an eye toward whether the officers broke the law or department rules. Police documents obtained by The Chronicle — including statements by some of the officers who were there — provide fresh insights into the events leading up to a shooting that has put Police Chief Greg Suhr’s job on the line, and reopened debates over the department’s use of force and its treatment of the African American community. The incident began at about 4 p.m. on Dec. 2, when officers were dispatched to San Francisco General Hospital to take a report from a 26-year-old Bayview man who had been slashed in the upper arm, according to police documents. The man, whose name police have withheld for his protection, told officers that he and a female friend had been eating in a car parked in front of an apartment building at 6670 Third St. when they saw a man “walking back and forth on the sidewalk talking,” according to investigators who interviewed the victim. The assailant then reached into the passenger’s side of the car with a knife, prompting the man seated there to “open the door to push the suspect away,” the police report says. Two officers responding to the crime scene — aided by a neighbor who saw the attack — briefly spotted the suspect but lost track of him. Within minutes, two officers spotted Woods, who matched the suspect’s description, waiting to board a Muni bus at Third Street and Fitzgerald Avenue. More officers arrived, some of them armed with weapons that fire nonlethal beanbags filled with lead shot. Police then hit Woods with two more rounds, including one that struck his leg, causing the limp that Woods displayed in the videos of the police confrontation. When a fourth beanbag was fired using a more powerful 40mm gun, the officer said, The subject appeared to be stunned and crouched to one knee but still refused to drop his knife. ... Since he’d gotten out, he’d earned his high school GED and landed a job at a delivery company, which could well have been jeopardized if he were hit with a new criminal charge. Investigators are also awaiting the results of toxicology results that could shed light on how Woods was able to walk away from a dose of pepper spray and four beanbag blasts.

Sarah Palin And Donald Trump: A Pair Of Narcissists Made For Each Other
latimes.com
People who were surprised by Sarah Palin's rambling Donald Trump endorsement have not been paying attention

Marriage, Poverty and the Political Divide
rss.nytimes.com
Married couples are generally more prosperous, so most lawmakers agree on the value of strong families, but not on how to help them avoid poverty.

Thousands protest abortion at S.F. March for Life
sfgate.com
Wade court decision that legalized abortion in the United States — for the San Francisco March for Life. Tens of thousands of antiabortion marchers flooded into the Civic Center Plaza for a rally and then marched along Market Street. “I’ll have nun of it,” read pins attached to the shirts of a youth group. “People need to understand the sanctity of life, especially young people,” Sharpe said. [...] the genocide of babies ends, until abortion disappears, we will be here marching. America is still struggling to change the minds of those who think abortion is just a procedure and not the ending of an innocent life. Signs reading “When abortion is illegal, women die” and “Fetuses are not babies” were waved in the air. There is this misconception that women are having reckless sex and using abortion as the answer. Sam Rodyah, a volunteer from Stop Patriarchy, said the aim of the rally was to make the antiabortion rally uncomfortable and change the terms of the march. “It is outrageous that this other side represents a vicious attack on women’s rights,” he said. The shouting and sign waving continued as the long line of marchers moved down Market Street.

Rep. John Lewis Speaks Out Against Trump's Divisive Rhetoric During L.A. Visit
latimes.com
“I've been around a while and Trump reminds me so much of a lot of the things that George Wallace said and did,” Lewis said in an interview with The Times after speaking at Cal State L.A. “I think demagogues are pretty dangerous, really. ... We shouldn't divide people, we shouldn't separate people.”

Trump Vows To Release His Tax Returns - Politico
politico.com
Trump said the two hold opposite views "on a lot of things."

300-year-old Cello Is Found Unharmed Inside Stolen Car
latimes.com
A stolen car containing a 300-year-old cello was recovered Thursday after Glendale residents noticed it had been parked in their neighborhood for a long time and called police.

Letter From Washington: Republicans Risk Repeating Mistake on Hispanic Vote
rss.nytimes.com
t bode well for a Republican approach highlighting hostility to immigration.