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THE NOONER for November 19, 2014

NOONER PAID SUBSCRIBERS at $39.99/year get these benefits:

  • the Nooner arrives at 11:30 a.m., rather than 12pm, 1pm, or whenever the hamsters feel like running
  • e-mail alerts about district changes, including new analysis and candidate additions
  • downloadable spreadsheet of all candidates, with district geography, analysis, and outlook
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AD39 (East San Fernando):

  • Patty Lopez (D) - 21,887
  • Raul Bocanegra (D-inc.) - 21,652

AD66 (Torrance):

  • David Hadley (R) - 53,177
  • Al Muratsuchi (D-inc.) - 52,048

LA County should have about 50,000 ballots left to count, and the next (and perhaps final) update will be Friday. 

THE CITY: SF supervisors elect Katy Tang as interim president [Marisa Lagos @SFChron] - Katy "Tang, who represents District 4, was elected Tuesday on an 8-0 vote to serve the remainder of President David Chiu's term when he is sworn into the state Assembly on Dec. 1. Tang will preside over two meetings in December, and the board will chose a permanent replacement for Chiu in January, when its new term begins."

"While the vote for Tang took only a few minutes, the lead-up to her election was fraught with drama — and came after the supervisors debated whether or not they should even be choosing a president Tuesday. Supervisors John Avalos and Eric Mar walked out of the board chambers, refusing to vote on the matter. "

BERDOO: San Bernardino given six months to come up with bankruptcy exit plan [Ryan Hagen @ SBSun] - "According to both the city and CalPERS, the city will make up all payments missed since the bankruptcy declaration — about $13.5 million — plus interest and fees in 24 equal installments over two years."

 

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  • The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network is seeking an experienced well-qualified advocate to direct its state legislative program. The State Legislative Director will serve as ACS CAN’s primary lobbyist at the State Capitol responsible for developing and executing its legislative agenda. Requires expertise in health policy, especially the Affordable Care Act, Medi-Cal and other access to care issues, and substantial experience working at State Capitol as legislative staff and/or lobbyist. Minimum salary: $85,000. For further details and to apply please visit: careers.peopleclick.com/careerscp/client_acs/external/gateway.do?functionName=viewFr


 

 

TOP HEADLINES ON AROUNDTHECAPITOL.COM AS OF 12:00PM
Jerry Brown takes on Janet Napolitano over UC tuition hikes
sfgate.com
The penny-pinching Brown has come out swinging against Napolitano’s idea of hiking UC tuition 5 percent a year for the next five years — saying that if tuition goes up, UC can forget about any extra money from the state. “The governor has made it very clear that funding increases for UC are contingent on tuition remaining flat,” Brown press secretary Evan Westrup told us. Rather than raise tuition, Brown — a member of the UC Board of Regents who regularly attends meetings — is calling on the university to reduce spending, offer more online classes and limit faculty and executive pay raises. To hammer home the message, Brown on Monday appointed former Assembly Speaker John Pérez — who has already gone as record saying the UC tuition plan “takes us in the wrong direction” — to a 12-year term on the board that starts immediately. The feeling in the Brown camp is that if the tuition hike is approved, it will stir student protests and put pressure on state lawmakers to increase funding to the system beyond a 4 percent bump-up promised for each of the next two years. Just two months ago, Brown vetoed legislation giving UC an extra $50 million for backlogged building maintenance — something Napolitano pointed out in an e-mail the other day announcing the tuition plan.

Democrats' Keystone Pipeline Bill Falls Short In Senate Vote
latimes.com
The Senate narrowly avoided a post-election showdown between the White House and Congress on Tuesday when a bill authorizing construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline failed to get the 60 votes needed to avert a filibuster.

Public Pensions In California Pass Another Bankruptcy Test | The Sacramento Bee
Dale Kasler @
sacbee.com
Be sure to include your name, daytime phone number, address, name and phone number of legal next-of-kin, method of payment, and the name of the funeral home/crematory to contact for verification of death.

SF taxi drivers promise a repeat of airport protest
Michael Cabanatuan @
sfgate.com
The chaotic cabdriver protest that clogged traffic and stranded travelers at San Francisco International Airport on Monday night will likely not be the last battle in the war between traditional taxis and on-demand ride services like Uber and Lyft. A recently organized coalition of San Francisco taxi drivers, pleased with the impact of the protest, vowed Tuesday to bring more disruption to SFO unless the airport director agrees to discuss their concerns that the ride services are being given an unfair advantage in serving the airport. “That’s just a sample that we showed them,” said Harbir Singh, a taxi driver and board member of the San Francisco Taxi Workers Alliance, which organized the protest. The protest was the latest skirmish in the ongoing fight between San Francisco’s much-maligned taxi industry and the technology-driven ride-service startups that use untrained drivers in personal cars and are summoned by smartphone apps. Taxi operators complain that the newcomers are barely regulated while the ride services argue that the cab industry was a monopoly in need of a shakeup. Airport officials had expected a protest, having issued a leafleting and picketing permit under SFO’s free-speech program. Doug Yakel, an airport spokesman, said blocking traffic was a violation of SFO’s rules banning protests from impeding travelers. Police did divert traffic, eventually preventing taxis from circling, John Garrity, commander of the San Francisco Police Department’s airport operations, said no arrests were made or citations issued. Steven Pitts, associate director of the UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education, said the National Taxi Workers Union is part of an effort by organized labor to reach out to other types of workers, often low-income employees like port truck drivers, in an effort to improve working conditions. Gruberg said the group has more than 600 dues-paying members and is growing as drivers become increasingly agitated over what they see as a lack of regulation of the ride services, giving them an unfair advantage over the heavily regulated taxi industry. [...] the last month or so, the services were officially banned from serving SFO, though many did anyway. Taxi companies and drivers complain that the ride services are permitted to operate with lower standards — for insurance, inspections, permits and training — that give them an unfair advantage and endanger the public. “Their goal is to heighten awareness and increase public discussion and pressure the agency to have a level playing field,” he said.

S.c. Attorney General Says He'll Appeal Same-sex Marriage Ruling
latimes.com
A federal appeals court on Tuesday rejected an effort by South Carolina's attorney general to block marriages between gay and lesbian couples, setting the stage for another appeal in the state's back-and-forth legal battles over same-sex marriage.

For Donors, Jerry Brown Wines But Not Dines | The Sacramento Bee
David Siders @
sacbee.com
Be sure to include your name, daytime phone number, address, name and phone number of legal next-of-kin, method of payment, and the name of the funeral home/crematory to contact for verification of death.

Costs soaring for Metropolitan Transportation Commissionâ
sfgate.com
The price of rehabbing the Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s newly purchased headquarters has more than doubled to $155 million since day one — making the agency’s move to San Francisco look more and more like the Bay Bridge of building deals. Like the construction of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge — which the commission helped oversee — the agency’s move from Oakland to the former post office building at 375 Beale St. has turned into a Pandora’s box of delays and rising costs. The saga of the Beale Street building began in October 2011, when the transportation commission’s board voted to spend about $93 million in toll money for the building and land, plus $74 million to seismically retrofit and rehab the structure. The idea was that, once completed, part of the building would be rented out to other agencies, businesses and retailers willing to pay top dollar to be in San Francisco. The penny-pinching Brown has come out swinging against Napolitano’s idea of hiking UC tuition 5 percent a year for the next five years — saying that if tuition goes up, UC can forget about any extra money from the state. “The governor has made it very clear that funding increases for UC are contingent on tuition remaining flat,” Brown press secretary Evan Westrup told us. Rather than raise tuition, Brown — a member of the UC Board of Regents who regularly attends meetings — is calling on the university to reduce spending, offer more online classes and limit faculty and executive pay raises. To hammer home the message, Brown on Monday appointed former Assembly Speaker John Pérez — who has already gone as record saying the UC tuition plan “takes us in the wrong direction” — to a 12-year term on the board that starts immediately. The feeling in the Brown camp is that if the tuition hike is approved, it will stir student protests and put pressure on state lawmakers to increase funding to the system beyond a 4 percent bump-up promised for each of the next two years. Just two months ago, Brown vetoed legislation giving UC an extra $50 million for backlogged building maintenance — something Napolitano pointed out in an e-mail the other day announcing the tuition plan.

Special Election Season Begins With Bonilla Seeking Desaulnier Seat | The Sacramento Bee
Jeremy B. White @
sacbee.com
Be sure to include your name, daytime phone number, address, name and phone number of legal next-of-kin, method of payment, and the name of the funeral home/crematory to contact for verification of death.

Why Unemployment Is Harder For Older Adults | California Health Report
Marty Graham @
healthycal.org
By Marty Graham

San Diego Considers Recycling Water For Drinking
ELLIOT SPAGAT Associated Press @
abcnews.go.com


League Of California Cities President May Lose Post | The Sacramento Bee
Dan Walters @
sacbee.com
Be sure to include your name, daytime phone number, address, name and phone number of legal next-of-kin, method of payment, and the name of the funeral home/crematory to contact for verification of death.

Bob Marley Estate Launches Marijuana Brand Named After Reggae Legend
latimes.com
Bob Marley brought reggae mainstream. Now his family hopes he can also hawk premium marijuana to the masses.

Health, labor groups seek $2 increase in California tobacco tax
latimes.com
A coalition of public health, labor and medical groups is launching a push for a new tobacco tax that would add $2 to the cost of each pack of cigarettes sold in California.

Prop. 47 Could Leave Counties Scrambling For Drug Treatment Funds - Sfgate
Jaxon Van Derbeken and Vivian Ho @
sfgate.com
The passage of Proposition 47 could leave San Francisco and other counties scrambling to make up the state money they used to receive for successfully treating rather than imprisoning low-level drug and property crime offenders, law enforcement officials say.

Nsa Surveillance Bill Defeated In Senate
latimes.com
WASHINGTON--Legislation to keep most Americans' phone records out of government hands was defeated in the Senate on Tuesday, dooming at least for now prospects of national security reforms that supporters said would protect the privacy of law-abiding citizens.

Louisiana Senate Seat Is Real Reward in Keystone Pipeline Vote
rss.nytimes.com
Two candidates in a runoff election in an state where the energy industry is important are claiming to shepherd the latest pipeline bill through Congress.

Designing California Cities For A Long-term Drought | Science | Kqed Public Media For Northern Ca
blogs.kqed.org
Meanwhile, most Californians live in cities designed, to a great extent, on the promise of nearly endless water, imported from wetter parts of the state via massive engineering projects like the California State Water Project.

L.A. Unified Discusses Possible Settlement In Miramonte Case
latimes.com
The Los Angeles Board of Education discussed a possible settlement offer Tuesday involving a former Miramonte Elementary School teacher accused of feeding semen to his students in what became the largest and costliest child abuse case in the school system.

BART line to San Jose chugging into view, in fits and starts
Michael Cabanatuan @
sfgate.com
Long considered a good idea, getting BART to the heart of Silicon Valley continues to be a struggle — despite the generosity of South Bay voters, who have twice raised their sales taxes, and support from the tech industry. After already curtailing plans for a Silicon Valley BART extension once, South Bay transportation officials are retrenching and considering cutting back again, this time by eliminating two stations from a future extension now seeking funding. BART is extending its tracks to the Warm Springs area of south Fremont, near the Tesla plant, and expects to start running trains to the new station late in 2015. [...] VTA officials pulled back on their plans to go downtown and on to Santa Clara, citing a low rating for competitive federal funding and depleted sales tax revenues caused in large part by the tech crash of the early 2000s. After regrouping, Silicon Valley leaders decided to go only as far as Berryessa and to ask voters to raise their sales taxes to make sure the extension could cover its operating costs. Bernice Alaniz, a VTA spokeswoman, said the agency has made no decision on whether to eliminate any stations but raised the idea as a possibility because it’s looking at how to cut costs to make the project more competitive in the federal New Starts program, which provides big money that makes it possible to build big projects. The 6.1-mile second phase of the Silicon Valley BART extension calls for construction of stations in Alum Rock in east San Jose, downtown near San Jose State University, at Diridon Station and the SAP Center arena and, finally, in Santa Clara. The criteria for capturing federal New Starts funding take into account ridership, cost, economic benefits, and the amount of housing and job development the project would create. VTA earlier this month raised the possibility of eliminating stations after taking a closer look at the revenues coming in from its sales tax measures, the costs of building the Berryessa extension and updated costs for the proposed extension to Santa Clara. Carl Guardino, executive director of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, said he’s confident that a plan can be worked out that would save the stations. Randy Rentschler, spokesman for the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, which coordinates transportation planning and financing in the Bay Area, said the difficulties of designing and running a high-ridership transit system in a car-oriented city like San Jose make it more critical that the project keep down its costs.

President Obama's Immigration Plans Hard To Block, Legal Experts Say
latimes.com
Legal experts say it may be hard to stop President Obama from giving as many as 5 million immigrants a reprieve from deportation.